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Electrical Safety Management Procedure (ESMP)

Purpose

This procedure describes how the Australian National University (ANU) manages electrical safety in the workplace, to ensure the safety of all staff, contractors, students and others from electrical hazards encountered at ANU.

This procedure ensures legal and other obligations of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Cth), the Work Health and Safety Regulations 2011 (Cth) and the University’s Work Health & Safety (WHS) Management System are met. This procedure is linked to the Australian National University’s Work health and safety policy and is one of the Safe Work Procedures within the WHS Management System.

This procedure will form the basis for all electrical work carried out at the ANU. This procedure will also form the basis for local area procedures.

Responsibility to comply with these procedures lies with all ANU staff and it will be the responsibility of supervisors/managers to ensure compliance.

Scope

  1. This procedure applies to the following electrical safety management requirements:
  1. All electrical work on the University’s electrical installations. This work should also meet requirements within the Campus Buildings Requirements Manual; and shall only be undertaken by a competent person assigned the appropriate category (refer Table 2).
  2. Electrical work undertaken at all University campuses shall comply with all relevant Commonwealth, State and Territory legislation, Codes of Practice, Australian Standards, guidance material and best practices.
  3. Inspection, testing and tagging of equipment.
  4. Work on ‘live’ electrical installations and equipment is to be avoided whenever practical;
  1. General safety information is provided in the ANU Brochure 'Electrical Safety - Be Safe with Electricity.

Definitions

  1. Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) is an automatic device used to provide an electric shock to the heart, with the intent of returning it to a normal rhythm.
  2. Competent Person is a person with the necessary practical and theoretical skills (acquired through training, qualification, experience or a combination of these) to correctly perform tasks within the scope of electrical work approved by management. Management must nominate the person against the categories in the Competent Persons section (Table 2).
  3. Electrical appliance is an electricity consuming device or apparatus (including the cord) that is connected to, or capable of being connected to the electrical installation via a socket outlet of an isolation switch. An electrical appliance is a sub set of electrical equipment.
  4. Electrical equipment refers to any apparatus, appliance, cable, conductor, fitting, insulator, material, meter or wire that:
  1. Is used for controlling, generating, supplying, transforming or transmitting electricity at a voltage greater than extra-low voltage; or
  2. Is operated by electricity at a voltage greater than extra-low voltage;
  3. Is part of an electrical installation located in an area, in which the atmosphere presents a risk to health and safety from fire or explosion; and
  4. Is not part of a motor vehicle.
  5. Electrical installation refers to electrical equipment (or group of items) that:
  6. Are permanently electrically connected together; and
  7. Can be supplied with electricity from an electricity supply authority or from a generating source.
  8. The electrical installation is the electricity supply to a building, and includes the main switchboard; distribution switchboards, sub-switchboards and all associated fixed wiring including final sub-circuits, such as socket-outlets, isolation switches, lights, etc.
  1. Electrical work refers to:
  1. Connecting electricity supply wiring to electrical equipment or disconnecting electricity supply wiring from electrical equipment; or
  2. Installing, removing, adding, testing, replacing, repairing, altering or maintaining electrical equipment or an electrical installation.
  1. Electrical work does not include: Work that involves connecting electrical equipment to an electricity supply by means of a flexible cord plug and socket outlet.
  2. Work on a non-electrical component of electrical equipment if the person carrying out the work is not exposed to an electrical risk;
  1. Replacing electrical equipment or a component of electrical equipment if that task can be safely performed by a person who does not have expertise in carrying out electrical work (e.g. replacing domestic fuses or light bulbs);
  2. Assembling, making, modifying or repairing electrical equipment as part of a manufacturing process;
  3. Building or repairing ducts, conduits or troughs where electrical wiring is or will be installed if:
  4. The ducts, conduits or troughs are not intended to be earthed; and
  5. The wiring is not energised with flowing electrical current, and the work is supervised by a competent electrical worker;
  6. Locating or mounting electrical equipment, or fixing electrical equipment in place, if this task is not performed in relation to the connection of electrical equipment to an electricity supply;
  7. Assisting a licensed electrician to carry out electrical work if:
  8. The assistant is directly supervised by the licensed electrician;
  9. The assistance does not involve physical contact with any energised electrical equipment; and
  10. Carrying out electrical work, other than work on energised electrical equipment, in order to meet eligibility requirements in relation to becoming a licensed electrician.
  1. Electrical work does not include work on electrical equipment that is operated by electricity at extra-low voltage except:
  1. Electrical equipment that is part of an electrical installation that is located in an area in which the atmosphere presents a risk to health and safety from fire or explosion; and
  2. In relation to electrical equipment that is part of an active impressed current cathodic protection system within the meaning of AS 2832.1:2004.
  3. Emergency procedures are procedures established prior to an incident, containing actions to be taken in the event of an emergency. They are utilised in order to minimise the effects of an incident causing damage to people, property or the environment.
  4. Extra-low voltage refers to extra low voltage (not exceeding 50 Volts Alternating Current (VAC) or 120Volt ripple free Direct Current (DC)), as defined in AS/NZS 3000: Australian/New Zealand Wiring Rules.

  1. Hostile operating environments refers to environments where:
  1. The normal use of electrical equipment exposes the equipment to operating conditions that are likely to result in damage to the equipment or a reduction in its expected life span, including conditions that involve significant exposure to moisture, heat, vibration, mechanical damage, corrosive chemicals or dust; or
  2. Electrical equipment is moved between different locations in circumstances where damage to the equipment or to a flexible electricity supply cord is reasonably likely.

  1. Higher electrical risk workplaces are ones with operating conditions where:
  1. The normal use of electrical equipment exposes the equipment to a hostile operating environment that involve significant exposure to moisture, heat, vibration, mechanical damage, corrosive chemicals or dust;
  2. Electrical equipment is moved between different locations in circumstances where damage to the equipment or to a flexible electricity supply cord is reasonably likely;
  3. Electrical equipment is frequently moved during its normal use;
  4. Electrical equipment forms part of, or is used in connection with, an amusement device.

  1. Live part refers to a conductor or conductive part intended to be energised in normal use. Live parts include a neutral conductor and conductive parts connected to a neutral conductor. See AS/NZS 3000: Australian/New Zealand Wiring Rules for items not considered live parts under the multiple earthed neutral (MEN) earthing system.
  2. Local Area - refers to a College, Research School or Service Division of the University.

  1. Low voltage refers to an operating voltage that exceeds extra-low voltage (ELV), but not exceeding 1000V AC or 1500V DC as defined in AS/NZS 3000 Australian/New Zealand Wiring Rules.

  1. Portable electrical plant, equipment and appliances refers to items that are easy to be carried or moved.
  2. Residual Current Device (RCD) is a safety switch that reduces the risk of electrocution. An RCD must have a tripping current that does not exceed 30 milliamps if electricity is supplied to the equipment not exceeding 20 amps.
  3. Safety Observer is a Competent Person assigned and specifically trained on responsibilities to observe and provide warning against the unsafe approach to exposed electrical equipment, including energised (live) conductors and other potential risks. Safety observers must:
  1. Have knowledge of the task being undertaken;
  2. Be competent in isolation techniques;
  3. Continuously observe the task and not be distracted;
  4. Provide emergency assistance and perform a rescue if needed;
  5. Be current and competent in rescue and Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation; (CPR) through nationally recognised training; and
  6. Be familiar with the location nearest Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) and its operation.
  1. Safe Work Method Statement (SWMS) in the context of this procedure is a control measure prepared under Work Health and Safety Regulations 2011 (Cth) Regulation 161 for electrical work on energised electrical equipment.

The SWMS in relation to energised electrical work must:

  1. Identify the electrical work;
  2. Specify hazards associated with that electrical work and risks associated with those hazards;
  3. Describe the measures to be implemented to control the risks; and
  4. Describe how the risk control measures are to be implemented, monitored and reviewed.
  1. Workers are anyone who carries out work for the University and includes staff, visiting and Honorary Appointments (VaHA), volunteers, titleholders, affiliates, labour hire workers, students gaining work experience and contractors of ANU. HDR students may be ANU workers or visitors as defined in Section 27 and 28 of the federal WHS ACT 2011 depending on their role but they are covered under the scope of this procedure.

  1. Workplace: A workplace is a place where work is carried out for a business or undertaking (E.g. the University) and includes any place where a worker goes, or is likely to be while at work.

  1. Workshop: A room, area, or small establishment where manual or light to heavy industrial work is done.
  2. Meaning of Electrical Work

Electrical Work Means:

  1. Connecting electricity supply wiring to electrical equipment or disconnecting electricity supply wiring from electrical equipment; or
  2. Installing, removing, adding, testing, replacing, repairing, altering or maintaining electrical equipment or an electrical installation; but

Does Not Include The Following:

  1. Work that involves connecting electrical equipment to an electricity supply by means of a flexible cord plug and socket outlet;
  2. Work on a non-electrical component of electrical equipment, if the person carrying out the work is not exposed to an electrical risk;

Example painting electrical equipment covers and repairing hydraulic components of an electrical motor.

    Replacing electrical equipment or a component of electrical equipment if that task can be safely performed by a person who does not have expertise in carrying out electrical work;

Example replacing a fuse or a light bulb.

  1. Assembling, making, modifying or repairing electrical equipment as part of a manufacturing process;
  2. Building or repairing ducts, conduits or troughs, where electrical wiring is or will be installed if:
  1. the ducts, conduits or troughs are not intended to be earthed; and
  2. the wiring is not energised; and
  3. the work is supervised by a licensed electrical worker;
  1. Locating or mounting electrical equipment, or fixing electrical equipment in place, if this task is not performed in relation to the connection of electrical equipment to an electricity supply;
  2. Assisting a licensed electrical worker to carry out electrical work if:
  1. the assistant is directly supervised by the licensed electrical worker; and
  2. the assistance does not involve physical contact with any energised electrical equipment;
  1. Carrying out electrical work, other than work on energised electrical equipment, in order to meet eligibility requirements in relation to becoming a licensed electrical worker.

Procedure

Exclusions

  1. Within the University site boundaries there are commercially leased areas where private entities own and/or maintain their own electrical appliances.
  2. These entities are exempt from this procedure (however compliance with the WHS Act and Regulations 2011 (Cth) or its latest revision is required);
  1. All privately owned electrical appliances in short-term serviced accommodation facilities;
  2. All privately owned electrical appliances in long-term accommodation; and
  3. Self-contained and domestic houses or units. However, all University supplied electrical appliances in University owned residential facilities are to be inspected, tested and tagged. It is a requirement that all electrical appliances in long-term accommodation be visually inspected. It is recommended that high-risk appliances (for example, heaters and cooking appliances) be tested and tagged.
  1. This requirement does not apply to coursework students using their own electrical appliances in a library or in lecture theatres, as the University does not have management or control of such activities.

Responsibilities

Dean, Director or nominated representative

  1. The College Dean, Research School or Service Division Director (or nominated representative) is responsible for:
  1. all non-installation electrical equipment (such as appliances, cord sets, power boards, etc.) in their building space or issued to their workers;
  2. ensuring a hazard management approach towards electrical safety;
  3. providing supervisors and management resources to manage electrical safety within their areas; and
  4. participating in workplace inspections.

Local area responsible person

  1. The local area responsible person is responsible for:
  1. appointing a competent electrical contract supervisor and/or project officer to supervise and manage electrical contractors;
  2. nominating and authorising competent people under the categories in this procedure;
  3. requesting ongoing access to a sub-main board only after consultation with relevant parties (Facilities and Services (F&S), other Category competent person), conducting a hazard assessment and documenting the access protocol. The access protocol must be included inside the unlocked sub-main board;
  4. ensuring compliance with the University’s Campus Buildings Requirements Manual;
  5. ensuring that electrical safe work procedures are developed in consultation with workers and implemented;
  6. ensuring documented hazard assessments of equipment, operations, activities and locations are undertaken and that identified risks are controlled;
  7. managing the issue, maintenance, repairs and modifications, testing, tagging and registering of electrical appliances;
  8. ensuring records of electrical appliances (an electrical appliance register with test results) are maintained and accessible to workers. A register of locally designed, manufactured and certified electrical equipment must also be kept;
  9. ensuring clear access to and around local electrical distribution boards;
  10. maintaining knowledge of the location for access to an Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) when energised work is conducted;
  11. participating in workplace inspections; and
  12. immediately reporting all injuries, exposures, hazards or dangerous occurrences to their supervisor in accordance with the WHS Incident management procedure.

Staff who engage or manage electrical contractors

  1. The Contractor liaison officer shall:
  1. use F&S accredited electrical contractors to work on the building’s electrical installation. Where this is not possible, they shall ensure the proper induction is completed and documented;
  2. ensure that prior to contractors commencing work, an induction process is completed formalising the University’s expectations, standards, site rules and service agreements. The F&S division contractor Induction is mandatory;
  3. ensure that hazard management processes are followed and documented;
  4. record the electrical contractor(s) qualifications, licence details, training (if relevant), and/or certificate(s) of competence required for the service;
  5. monitor electrical contractors and services provided according to the contractual agreement;
  6. ensure completion of prescribed statutory and organisational documentation associated with the electrical service(s) provided. E.g. where applicable a Certificate of Electrical Safety is provided/receipted;
  7. ensure any sub-contracting of electrical work is documented and authorised;
  8. allow access to an Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) when energised work is conducted; and
  9. immediately report all injuries, exposures, hazards or dangerous occurrences to their supervisor in accordance with the WHS Incident management procedure.

Research group leaders and supervisors

  1. Research group leaders and supervisors are responsible for:
  1. ensuring workers undertake any compulsory and recommended electrical safety training;
  2. ensuring documented hazard assessments of equipment, operations ,activities and locations are undertaken and that identified and residual risks are controlled;
  3. ensuring that electrical safe work procedures are developed in consultation with workers and implemented; participating in workplace inspections; and
  4. immediately report all injuries, exposures, hazards or dangerous occurrences in accordance with the WHS Incident management procedure.

Workers

  1. Workers must:
  1. read and comply with electrical safety information and any instructions provided;
  2. complete all required electrical safety training;
  3. only use electrical appliances that have passed a visual inspection. Those items with an ‘out of date or failed’ test tag, danger tag or similar must not be used;
  4. check that electrical appliances have a current test tag attached before use;
  5. upon identification of equipment that is overdue for inspection, testing and tagging they must conduct a visual inspection, verify whether the appliance requires testing and report the piece of equipment to their supervisor, competent persons or management;
  6. ensure the equipment is set up correctly and used according to safe operating instructions or recommended practices;
  7. never repair, modify, or interfere with electrical equipment unless qualified to do so;
  8. never interfere with by-pass isolation devices, marker tags or labels on electrical equipment;
  9. be aware of the basic electrical safety features of their equipment;
  10. correctly use safety devices and maintain personal protective equipment;
  11. only use appropriate Electrical Portable Outlet Device (EPOD, E.g. power boards). EPODs must have overload protection and an Australian approval marking. "Low-cost" and, by implication, low quality EPODs should be avoided especially for high usage items;
  12. not use double adaptors and ‘Piggy back’ plugs;
  13. ensure that where travel adaptors are used they contain an Australian approval marking and have been tested and tagged; and
  14. immediately report all injuries, exposures, hazards or dangerous occurrences to their supervisor in accordance with the WHS Incident management procedure.

Electrically competent persons

  1. An electrically competent person is required to:
  1. only undertake electrical work within the scope defined by their competent person category and approved by management;
  2. not undertake electrical work outside their area of expertise without guidance from a suitably competent person;
  3. maintain their professional qualifications and competency, including undertaking relevant University WHS courses;
  4. maintain knowledge of current safe working procedures in relevant Australian Standards such as AS/NZS 4836 Safe working on low voltage electrical installations and AS/NZS 3760 In-service inspection and testing of electrical equipment. Category 1 competent people shall be familiar with AS/NZS 4836 Safe working on low voltage electrical installations;
  5. address issues under this procedure for electrical appliances, including the issue, maintenance, repairs and modifications, testing, tagging and registering of such appliance, the safety of such appliance, and its compliance with the rules and codes of relevant regulatory bodies and Australian Standards;
  6. observe safe electrical work procedures;
  7. eliminate or minimise risks when working with or on electrical equipment or the electrical installation;
  8. be familiar with the location of available Automatic External Defibrillators (AED);

Safety observers

  1. A safety observer must:
  1. have knowledge of the task being undertaken;
  2. be competent in isolation techniques;
  3. continuously observe the task (and not be distracted by other duties);
  4. provide emergency assistance and perform a rescue, if needed;
  5. be current and competent in rescue and Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) through nationally recognised training; and
  6. be familiar with the location nearest Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) and its operation.

Contractors and sub-contractors

  1. contractor shall:
  1. participate in relevant university induction or training;
  2. be aware of the University’s and local requirements, including the University’s Campus Buildings Requirements Manual (when relevant);
  3. communicate (in the agreed manner) any WHS issues that may arise;
  4. immediately report to supervision every injury, exposure, hazard or dangerous incident that occurs while undertaking an activity at the University; and
  5. take note of WHS updates from their trade association.

Facilities and services

  1. The Director Facilities and Services (F&S), or their nominee, is responsible for the electrical installation in all buildings, including the provision, maintenance, repair, alterations and additions to the electrical installation, the safety of such installation, and its compliance with the rules and codes of the relevant Electrical Regulating Authority and relevant Australian Standards and codes of practice.
  2. The Director, F&S or nominee shall:
  1. nominate competent people in accordance with the competent person categories, ensuring that their competencies meet the requirements of the task undertaken;
  2. monitor electrical contractors and services provided;
  3. ensure electrical service tasks are supervised, inspected and monitored in accordance with contractual agreements;
  4. ensure compliance with the University’s Campus Buildings Requirements Manual;
  5. ensure completion of prescribed statutory and organisational documentation associated with the electrical service(s) provided, e.g. where applicable, provide a Certificate of Electrical Safety;
  6. ensure any sub-contracting of electrical work is documented and authorised;
  7. ensure all Facilities and Services competent people are registered on the HRMS database;
  8. ensure that competent people they authorise are appropriately inducted, have the necessary competencies and experience for the nominated tasks, have appropriate safe systems of work; and
  9. take note of WHS updates provided by trade associations.

General Electrical Hazards

Electrical plant, equipment, appliances, and accessories

  1. Electrical appliances shall connect to the electrical installation through an approved socket outlet or through an isolation switch. The maximum current rating for a standard power point is 10 amps.
  2. The Australian Standard AS/NZS 3112 specifies larger pins and differently shaped ground pins for power points with current ratings of 15, 20, 25 and 32 amps. Power points are also available specifically for external use - these are required to have a special weather proofing rating (to a minimum of IP67).
  3. Power boards (Electric Portable Outlet Devices, EPODs) where used, shall incorporate a current limiting device (circuit breaker) and, where practical, be mounted with the outlets in the vertical plane and protected from mechanical, electrical or water damage
  4. CAUTION: Extension cords should only be used as a temporary (not permanent) solution and are not to be installed as fixed wiring.
  5. CAUTION: Double adaptors and similar are NOT to be used in the University, as they have no overload protection.
  6. All electrical equipment requiring in-service inspection and testing which:
  1. has not been tested; or
  2. has failed testing; or
  3. is overdue for testing; or
  4. is within 1 month of a test expiring.
  5. Must not be used until it is tested in compliance with AS/NZS 3760 : In-service safety inspection and testing of electrical equipment.(ref Table 1)
  1. CAUTION: Battery chargers, power supply units and transformers that have been disconnected from the device MUST be removed/isolated from power source when not in use. E.g. phone chargers, laptop chargers. Battery powered devices should not be left on charge longer than the manufacturers recommended charge times. Items on charge should not be covered, placed on flammable surfaces and should be located in well ventilated area.

Privately Owned Electrical Appliances

The use of privately-owned electrical equipment in University workplaces (except Halls of Residence and University House) is not permitted unless it is inspected, tested and tagged in accordance with Table 1 of this procedure.

  1. The cost of testing and tagging by a competent person or external company is to be met by the appliance owner.
  2. The use of privately-owned electrical equipment is not permitted for use in a laboratory or workshop regardless whether it is electrically tested and tagged or not. (See exclusions)
  3. The University has provided power outlets, for the use of visitors. Privately-owned electrical appliances (for example, laptop computer or phone charges) may be used at these outlets provided that it complies with the appropriate Australian or international electrical manufacturing standard. The equipment must be inspected and maintained by the owner and be in a safe condition.
  4. CAUTION: Not all power outlets at ANU are RCD protected.
  5. WARNING: Battery chargers are not to be left connected to power outlet if not connected to a device. This can pose a fire hazard.

Section 1: Pre-work Operational Procedure

Scope

  1. All electrical equipment within the ANU, or any electrical equipment used by ANU workers (see exclusions) which includes:
  1. New equipment placed into service for the first time;
  2. Already in-service electrical equipment;
  3. Electrical equipment that has been serviced or repaired;
  4. Second hand electrical equipment returning to or being placed in service; or
  5. Electrical equipment available for hire.

Electrical Lockout Procedures

  1. Isolate, De-Energise, Lockout and Tag out Plant

Isolation procedure

  1. Isolation procedures in each workplace may vary because of differences in plant, power sources, hazards and processes. However, every isolation procedure should include the following basic steps:

Shut the plant down

  1. The operation of a single switch or valve can usually shut down plant that has a single energy source. More complex plant may have to be shut down in a sequence, for example, one conveyor before another, or by shutting down several energy and control sources.

Identify all energy sources and other hazards

  1. Isolation procedures should identify all energy sources likely to re-activate the plant and place people at risk.

The energy sources include:

  1. Electricity, including mains, solar, UPS, battery and generator;
  2. Fuels;
  3. Heat;
  4. Steam;
  5. Fluids under pressure, such as water, air or hydraulic oil stored energy accumulate hydraulic pressure, battery power, air tanks and gravity;
  6. Radiation; and
  7. Fail safe devices – designed to move components when power fails.
  1. Where possible, ANU workplaces should use original designer and installer 'as built' diagrams of plant installations showing location and details of various plant components, isolation points, switches, valves, energy lines, pipes, power sources and control points, including computers, as part of the isolation procedures.
  2. If original designer and installer 'as built' diagrams of plant installations are not available, workplaces should develop new diagrams/photographs.
  3. Shutting the plant down may require identifying other hazards and minimising or removing the risk of injury. For example, associated equipment may need to be locked-out to prevent re-activation, or valves on pipes and lines carrying gases or fluids may need to be locked shut or blanked off.
  4. Depending on the plant, other hazards may include:
  1. Hazardous substances, such as gases, acids, alkalis and solvents;
  2. Falls;
  3. Burns;
  4. Asphyxiation from dust, fumes, low oxygen levels, confined spaces; and
  5. Impact.

Identify All Isolation Points

  1. All plant that could require an isolation procedure should have appropriate isolation points for all energy sources clearly marked so work on the plant can proceed safely.
  2. It is important to identify all isolation points in a system, as it may be necessary to use a local isolator to shut down a specific part of the machine, a motor for example, while the rest of the associated plant remains in operation.
  3. WARNING: Emergency stop buttons, lanyards and similar stop devices on their own are not satisfactory isolation points. It is dangerous to rely solely on emergency stopping devices, because they are not designed for frequent use, cannot be locked out in all cases and may allow energy to be re-activated. They may also allow control circuits to remain live. Consider remote control rooms and process computers when identifying isolation points.

Isolate all Energy Sources

  1. The person in control of the ANU workplace should also identify a person (or persons) who knows and understands the complexities of the plant and appoint that person (or persons) to coordinate the isolation of all energy sources and hazards of the plant.
  2. Identify and isolate all electricity sources, bearing in mind some plant will have several control stations and sections of plant may have independent electricity sources. If programmable logic devices control the equipment, then it is essential to use local isolating switches to achieve secure and safe isolation. Do not rely on programmable logic devices for the isolation of equipment, unless the device has been certified as a programmable logic controller (PLC) which can reliably isolate equipment by activating its controls.

Exception:

  1. Where equipment connects via a plug and socket, isolation can be carried out by the equipment operator.
  2. If equipment is hard wired (permanent connection), or has multiple sources or power, only a competent person, such as an electrician, should isolate and disconnect all electricity supply to an item of plant, not just the control circuit.
  3. Having a competent person isolate and disconnect electricity supply makes sure equipment cannot be energised via another source or control system.

De-energise All Stored Energies

  1. Take any of the following steps necessary to guard against energy remaining in the plant after it has been isolated from its energy sources:
  1. Inspect the plant to make sure all parts have stopped moving.
  2. Install ground wires.
  3. Relieve trapped pressure.
  4. Release the tension on springs, or block the movement of spring-driven parts.
  5. Block or brace parts that could fall.
  6. Block parts in hydraulic and pneumatic systems that could move from the loss of pressure.
  7. Bleed the lines and leave vent valves open.
  8. Drain process piping systems and close valves to prevent the flow of hazardous material.
  9. Use a blank flange to block a line where there is no valve.
  10. Purge reactor tanks and process lines.
  11. Dissipate extreme cold or heat, or provide protective clothing.
  12. If stored energy can re-accumulate, monitor it to make sure it stays below hazardous levels.
  13. Dissipate stored electrical energy in capacitors etc.
  14. Locking out all isolation points.

  1. A wide range of devices are available for locking out energy sources and other hazards. As well as interlocked guards, lockout devices can include:
  1. Padlocks and chains;
  2. Safety lockout jaws or hasps which use multiple padlocks;
  3. Switches with a built-in lock; and
  4. Lockouts for circuit breakers, fuses and valves.

NOTE: Only devices that incorporate a lock or can accommodate one or more padlocks are suitable for locking out energy sources.

One Person, One Lock

  1. If more than one person is working on the same plant, each person should attach their own lock to prevent the energy isolator being opened before all locks have been removed or opened. The isolation procedure should identify common lockout points to make sure energy cannot be restored while someone is still working on the plant.
  2. If two or more people are working on plant that is isolated through several lockout points, each person should attach a lock and tag to each lockout point.
  3. The need for multiple locks on each lockout point can be avoided by using a lock box. The lock box system uses only one lock at each lockout point. Keys to the locks of the plant's lockout points are inside a box which is locked by all the individual locks of people working on the same plant.

One lock, one key

  1. Each person working on the plant should have their own lock, key and tag. There should be no duplicate key available for any lock, except a master or duplicate key for use in an emergency. The master or duplicate key should be secured and not readily available except in an emergency. (See WHS code of practice – Managing Risks of Plant and Equipment.)
  2. During plant inspection, repair, maintenance, cleaning or adjustment, each person should only hold the one key to their lock. That person is responsible for both locking and unlocking the lockout device.

Multiple Energy Sources

  1. If more than one energy source or hazard has to be locked out to enable safe shutdown of the plant, the same person should hold the single key to each lockout device.

Tagging

  1. WARNING: A tag is not an effective isolation device. A tag acts only as a means of providing information to others at the workplace. A lock should be used as an isolation device, however where a lock is used a tag should also be incorporated to explain the purpose of the lockout.

Commonly used warning tags include:

Personal danger tags

  1. A personal danger tag on the isolation devices of an item of equipment is a warning that the equipment is unsafe and that operating the equipment may endanger the person who attached the tag. Personal danger tags should be restricted to employees who will be working on equipment. Destroy all disposable personal danger tags after use.
  2. A personal danger tag should be attached to an isolator in a visible position whenever the isolator is used to lock out an energy source to allow work to be done.
  3. The personal danger tag should accompany each lock used in an isolation procedure and should identify the person who put the tag and lock in place, provide contact information of the person whom put the danger tag in place, the time and date this occurred, state the reason for the danger tag being placed and identify the item of plant that is being isolated.
  4. The person doing the work should fasten their personal danger tag on all lockout devices involved in the isolation procedure. If more than one person is involved in the work, each person should attach their own lock and personal danger tag to the lockout device. Locks are available that have a personal danger tag incorporated to make sure the tag cannot be removed by any person other than the person who attached it.

Removal of Tags

  1. Removal of a personal danger tag from an isolating device should be carried out as soon as possible after completing the work.
  2. WARNING: Only the person whose name is written on a personal danger tag can remove the tag. This should be done before leaving the worksite at the end of the shift. If work is to continue the new worker will install a tag.
  3. The workplace isolation procedure should include the course of action if a person does not remove a personal danger tag before leaving the worksite.
  4. Where work on plant is not completed by the end of a working shift and the plant is required to remain isolated, arrangements should be made for out of service tags to be placed on each isolating point before the removal of personal danger tags. If work on the plant is to continue during the next shift, there should be a 'hand over' briefing by the shift leaving the site to the shift taking over the work. The briefing should include the status of the work and the removal or replacement of personal danger tags and locks.

Out of Service Tags

  1. An out of service tag is a notice that states appliances or equipment are out of operation for repairs and alteration, or plant that is still being installed.
  2. WARNING: Do not operate an appliance or equipment with an out of service tag attached. Out of service tags should not be relied upon to provide personal protection.
  3. An out of service tag on an item of plant shows that the plant is unserviceable and should not be used. An out of service tag can be attached to non-powered plant such as ladders, jacks and trolleys and powered plant. Out of service tags should be attached to the main controls if possible, or to a prominent part if there are no controls, such as with damaged ladder.
  4. A competent person with specific knowledge relating to the plant should attach out of service tags. Out of service tags should be placed on devices which isolate energy sources only when those devices are set in the 'off' or 'safe' position.
  5. Before attaching an out of service tag, all required details on the tag should be clearly entered in the spaces provided, with emphasis given to the reason for placing the tag. Tags should be securely fixed so they are clearly visible.
  6. Except in an emergency, out of service tags should only be removed by a person who is both familiar with the plant and fully understands why the tag was placed.
  7. In the absence of any personal danger tag or lock, removal of an out of service tag releases plant for use, and should not be done before ensuring that:
  1. All people known to have been working on the plant are clear of the plant.
  2. An inspection of the plant shows that all machinery guards are in place, that all protective devices are functional, that all maintenance tools and aids have been removed, and that the equipment is safe for normal use.
  1. Out of service tags should provide a clear 'DO NOT OPERATE' warning, and warn that failure to obey may cause damage to the equipment and/or injury to a person. It is essential that isolating mechanisms which have out of service tags attached are not switched, manipulated or interfered with while the tags are in place.
  2. Personal danger tags and out of service tags should not be used together on the same item of equipment because they relate to different circumstances. An out of service tag should be removed when a personal danger tag is added, and vice versa. On completion of maintenance, cleaning or other work, remove the tags before the plant returns to operation.
  3. CAUTION: Only those qualified people who are familiar with the equipment can remove the CAUTION tags.

Testing Isolation Procedure

  1. After plant has been shut down, locked out and tagged, all isolated power sources should be tested, first with appropriate instruments and then by trying to re-activate the plant, before any person attempts to start work.
  2. A person who understands the complexity of the plant, or parts of the plant should do testing and starting the plant, including remote control stations and computers.
  3. CAUTION: It is not safe to assume an isolator has locked out an electricity source just because the isolator is in an open position. While the open position should create an air gap between contact points, electricity can weld the points together. If the contact points become welded together, the points remain connected even when the isolator appears to be open.
  4. Work on the plant should not begin until tests have confirmed it is safe to do so. Before using any instruments that test isolation procedure, employers should make sure the testing equipment is calibrated and working properly.

Other Hazards:

  1. Once electrical isolation has been achieved there are other hazards to consider such as:
  1. Is confined space entry required.
  2. Is working at heights required.
  3. Will hazardous substances be used or encountered.
  4. Is noise going to be an issue.
  5. Manual handling hazards.
  6. Fatigue and musculoskeletal hazards.
  7. Hot and cold hazards.
  8. Environmental hazards and risks.
  9. Other hazards and risks as identified.

Section 2: Functional Inspection and Testing

Inspection, testing and tagging of portable electrical plant, equipment and appliances

  1. Electrical equipment shall be confirmed as safe before being plugged into an electrical socket outlet by workers and students using the electrical equipment. To achieve this, the electrical equipment shall have undergone in service inspection and testing IAW- AS/NZS 3760 In- Service Inspection and Testing.
  2. All workers and students are required to follow the ‘Electrical Safety’ Brochure requirements when using electrical equipment.
  3. Visual Inspection – Before each use, all workers and students must undertake a visual inspection of the physical condition of any electrical equipment they will use or work with, especially the lead and plug connections for any abnormalities, for example broken or discoloured lead, and to ensure that, if required, the appliance has a current test tag. If any unusual sign(s) exist(s) do not connect the appliance – send for repair or testing by a competent person.

(Refer to Table 2 for levels of competency)

  1. International electrical equipment directly imported by, or on behalf of the ANU must be inspected by a competent person to ensure it meets relevant Australian Standards prior to its use or installation. Electrical equipment that does not meet relevant standards must be made compliant and recertified by competent persons familiar with the ANU Electrical Design Certification process.

Testing and Tagging For University Workplaces

  1. An electrical safety test shall be conducted by a competent person for electrical plant and equipment to be used in a hostile operating environment in the University workplaces before connecting the plant and equipment to an electrical installation.
  2. Local Areas will ensure the newly commissioned equipment, appliance or accessory is included in the next round of scheduled testing or within prescribed timeframes in accordance with Table 1.
  3. Electrical safety tests must be conducted regularly in accordance with Table 1 of this procedure. Testing and tagging is also mandatory following any repair or modification or for all second-hand electrical equipment before re-entering it into service.

Exclusions

  1. Electrical equipment excluded by the scope of AS/NZS 3760 In-service inspection of electrical equipment does not require in service testing. Such electrical equipment includes:
  1. Electrical equipment which would need to be dismantled to perform the inspection and tests specified in the Standard;
  2. Electrical equipment (such as suspended light fittings) which is at a height of 2.5metres or greater above the ground, floor or platform; and
  3. Fixed light fittings (luminaires), electric doors, toilet fans and similar equipment considered part of the building infrastructure.
  1. These items may undergo installation tests when introduced to service.


Table 1. Intervals between tests and tag inspections depending on the type of environment and equipment

Type of equipment

Type of environment

Equipment including Class I equipment, Class II equipment, cord sets, cord extension sets and EPODs

Push-button test – by user (Portable)

Push-button test – by user (Fixed)

Operating time and push-button test (Portable)

Operating time and push-button test (Fixed)

Factories, workshops, places of manufacture, assembly, maintenance or fabrication

6 months

Daily, or before every use, whichever is the longer

6 months

12 months

12 months

Environment where the equipment or supply flexible cord is subject to flexing in normal use OR is open to abuse OR is in a hostile environment

12 months

3 months

6 months

12 months

12 months

Environment where the equipment or supply cord is NOT subject to flexing in normal use and is NOT open to abuse and is NOT in a hostile environment

5 years

3 months

6 months

2 years

2 years

Test Equipment Calibration

  1. All testing will only be performed with test instruments calibrated according to manufacturer’s specifications. Instrumentation used for in-service testing shall comply with the requirements given in AS\NZS 3760 In-service inspection of electrical equipment.
  2. For any University owned testing instrument, their accuracy shall be routinely checked, both initially and on an annual basis. Refer to WHS monitoring and testing procedure for further information on the calibration of testing equipment.

Testing Qualifications and Time Frames

  1. Electrical testing can be performed by competent persons. All electrical testing and tagging activities performed by internal competent persons must be risk assessed and have a safe work procedure (SWP) developed by their manager or supervisor in consultation with the workers who are required to perform such activities.
  2. WHS Regulations Section 150 (para 3 and 4), 162 and 165 outline timeframes for records to be maintained.

The record of testing:

  1. must specify the following:

(i) the name of the person who carried out the testing;

(ii) the date of the testing;

(iii) the outcome of the testing;

(iv) the date on which the next testing must be carried out; and

  1. may be in the form of a tag attached to the electrical equipment tested.

Electrical testing frequencies in local areas must comply with Table 1 requirements.

  1. All electrical equipment requiring electrical testing be tagged. For hostile environments the items must also be recorded within an electrical item register.
  2. The test information and/or tag must be kept until the next test, or until the appliance is permanently removed from the workplace or disposed of.
  3. Electrical equipment test information must be accessible to all workers, for use in hazard and risk assessments.

Unsafe electrical equipment

  1. Unsafe electrical equipment, identified during the visual inspection or at any time during use in the workplace, must be de-energised (turned off or disconnected) and removed from service immediately.
  2. Unsafe equipment will be Tagged and reported to supervisor and/or Director’s delegate in a timely manner.
  3. Unsafe equipment should be isolated in quarantined area until repaired or disposed of. This applies to all plant and equipment not permanently connected to power source E.g. Drill Press or power saw.

WARNING: The unsafe electrical equipment must not be reconnected to an electrical source until it is repaired or tested. The choice of remedial action, disposal or other corrective action shall be determined by the owner or the person responsible for the safety of the site where the equipment is used. Local process may be required for each ANU work area.

Hazard Management for General Electrical Hazards

  1. When working with electrical equipment during a work activity that presents electrical hazards, the activity is required to be risk assessed according to WHSMS Handbook Chapter 3.1 Appendix A, the electrical hazards must be identified, risk assessed and controlled and reviewed in accordance with the Chapter 3.1 risk assessment methodology.
  2. Computers, mobile phones and laptops used in low risk environments are not required for a risk assessment.

Hazard Management – Specific Controls – Residual Current Devices (RCDs)

  1. Residual Current Devices are required to protect socket outlets in higher electrical risk workplaces (see definitions).
  2. An RCD is not required if the supply of electricity to the electrical equipment:
  1. Does not exceed 50 volts alternating current (ac); or
  2. Is direct current (dc); or
  3. Is provided through an isolating transformer that provides at least an equivalent level of protection; or
  4. Is provided from a non-earthed socket outlet supplied by an isolated winding portable generator that provides at least an equivalent level of protection; or
  5. RCD installations must comply with relevant regulations.

Testing Residual Current Devices

  1. RCDs, both fixed and portable, must be tested by a competent person in accordance with AS/NZS 3760 to ensure that the devices are operating effectively.
  2. Portable RCDs shall be tested at least annually by a competent person. A record of all testing of an RCD (other than daily push-button testing) must be kept until the device is next tested or the device is permanently removed from use.
  3. A new portable RCD unit shall be tested by pressing the ‘trip test’ button to ensure the RCD is effective and working prior to use by equipment operator. This same test should also be carried out daily before each use.

CAUTION: New Portable RCD will be tagged IAW Table 1 of this procedure.

  1. RCD faults are routinely identified via routine testing. Faulty RCDs must be taken out of service immediately and replaced with a functional RCD unit as soon as possible.
  2. For portable RCDs owned by the Local Area, the local area is responsible for replacing the faulty RCDs.
  3. For RCDs owned by F&S, whether fixed or portable, the relevant Local Area must advise F&S, who must take the faulty RCD out of service immediately and replace it as soon as possible.

Residual Current Devices Trips

  1. An RCD trip indicates a fault of the electrical equipment or supply. Where this has happened, the relevant local area must contact F&S for an electrician to investigate the faults of the electrical equipment or supply if they do not have access to their own electrician to investigate the fault.
  2. RCD Records

The person must keep a record of all testing of a residual current device (other than any testing conducted daily) until the earlier of the following occurs:

  1. The device is next tested; and
  2. The device is permanently removed from use.
  1. Records of test and tag must be maintained. Electrical appliances tested shall be tagged and recorded within an electrical item register.

Uninterruptable Power Supply (UPS)

  1. A risk assessment must be undertaken prior to the installation of an uninterruptable power supply (UPS). The RCD protection of the electrical installation is not effective at the output of a UPS. An additional RCD is required on the output to maintain protection.
  2. Different UPS designs can affect RCD protection effectiveness. Any UPS used should be appropriately rated and shall be installed, inspected, tested, maintained and monitored according to manufacturer instructions.
  3. Ensure that, where applicable, UPS’s are tested, inspected and tagged as required by this procedure.

Hazard Management – Specific Controls – Emergency stop switches

  1. Emergency stop switches that isolate the electrical supply should be installed in laboratories and workshops where practical as determined by a risk assessment conducted by the electrically competent person in consultation with managers and supervisors of laboratory and workshops.
  2. The emergency stop switches must be easily accessible and clearly labelled. Emergency stop switches shall be tested on commission and thereafter at intervals determined by area management in consultation with F&S.

Hazard Management – Specific Controls – Workplace inspections

  1. All Local Areas are required to implement WHSMS Handbook Chapter 4.1 requirements and conduct workplace inspections using the prescribed templates in Figtree accordingly. Unserviceable electrical equipment identified through the inspections are to be considered unsafe and removed from service for repair or disposal.


Section 3: Electrical Works Performed by University Workers

Electrical work (See definitions)

  1. All electrical work performed by University workers must have all hazards identified, risk assessed and controlled in accordance with WHSMS Handbook Chapter 3.1 methodology prior to work being performed.
  2. Where a SWP is required as a risk control, the SWP or SWMS must be developed and endorsed by authorised personnel. Work must only be undertaken by a competent person in accordance with Table 2.
  3. For externally engaged contractors, see Electrical Contractor Section.

University Design Certification

  1. Any electrical equipment failing design standards as judged by a suitably qualified worker, shall be subjected to the University’s Design Certification process.
  2. All in-house designed, manufactured and\or modified electrical equipment that uses or generates voltages exceeding extra low voltage ( >50 Vac or >120 VDC) shall be subjected to, and approved under, the University’s Design Certification process for electrical equipment before being placed into service.
  3. Work on electrical equipment shall be done in compliance with relevant Australian Standards as well as any risk assessments and SWPs developed.
  4. Work on electrical equipment must only be carried out on de-energised plant/equipment (E.g. with the power disconnected and\or the system de-energised) unless in circumstances specified in the Energised Electrical Work Section. All Directors, manager, supervisors and workers must ensure this requirement is adhered to in all areas and activities under their control.
  5. Prior to conducting any electrical work, the workers and their managers/supervisors are required to determine whether the electrical plant/equipment is energised.

They must ensure each exposed part of the plant/equipment is treated as energised until it is isolated and determined not to be energised and each high-voltage exposed part is earthed after being de-energised. If a plant/equipment is determined as energised, the worker and their managers/supervisors must ensure:

  1. WHS REG 155 - The electrical plant/equipment is de-energised and locked and tagged out before any electrical work is allowed to be conducted; and
  2. WHS REG 156 - The de-energised plant/equipment involved is not inadvertently re-energised while the electrical work is being carried out. Refer to Procedure: Isolation and danger tagging ANUP-000571 for full requirements.
  1. CAUTION: Use of a cable tie to lock out energy sources for de-energising purposes does not comply with this requirement. A padlock with key access shall be used in accordance with Procedure: Isolation and danger tagging.

Electrical Work on Energised Electrical (E.g. Live Electrical Work)

  1. Electrical work on energised electrical plant/equipment is strictly prohibited in the University unless:
  1. It is necessary in the interests of health and safety that the electrical work is carried out while the equipment is energised (e.g. it may be necessary for life-saving equipment to remain energised and operating while electrical work is carried out on the equipment);
  2. It is necessary that the electrical equipment to be worked on is energised in order for the work to be carried out properly;
  3. It is necessary for the purposes of testing to ensure the equipment is de-energised as required by WHS Regulations 2012 (Cth) Regulation 155; or
  4. There is no reasonable alternative means of carrying out the work.

  1. If energised electrical work absolutely has to be performed in accordance with the above, the following steps must be adhered to by the manager/supervisor of the electrical work and the worker directly conducting the energised:

  1. Conduct a hazard and risk assessment in accordance with WHSMS Handbook Chapter 3.1 methodology on the proposed electrical work and ensure all controls are implemented;
  2. This risk assessment must also identify emergency situations and the control measures required;
  3. Contingency Plan or Emergency Procedures must be developed if the risk assessment outcomes identifies them as a control measure;
  4. Develop a SWP or SWMS for the electrical work and have it approved;
  5. Ensure the area where the energised electrical work is to be carried out is clear of obstructions to allow for easy access and exit;
  6. Check to confirm the point at which the electrical equipment can be disconnected or isolated from its electricity supply is:
  1. clearly marked or labelled;
  2. clear of obstructions to allow for easy access and exit by the worker carrying out the electrical work or other competent persons (e.g. electrical contractors); and
  3. capable of being operated quickly;
  1. Ensure an Energised Electrical Permit is completed and being authorised by a qualified Permit Issuer in accordance with WHSMS Handbook Chapter 3.1 requirements;
  2. Identify available first aid officers and the location of readily accessible AEDs and their operation. A list of AEDs can be found in List of all AEDs and the Acton campus locations; and
  3. Consult with local area management and workers regarding how, when and what condition the electrical equipment will be returned to service and likely changes.
  1. Energised electrical work must only be conducted by a qualified and competent electrical worker in accordance with Table 2 with an unrestricted electrician licence who has the appropriate tools, testing equipment and personal protective equipment (PPE) that are suitable for the work and have been properly tested and maintained in good working order.
  2. Test equipment for working on energised electrical installations (live) shall meet the requirements of the voltage categories of AS/NZS 61010.
  3. All workers involved in the energised electrical work are required to and must use the tools, testing equipment and PPE properly and correctly in accordance with the instructions provided to them.
  4. The managers and supervisors of the energised electrical work and workers carrying out the work must ensure they conduct the work in accordance with the developed and approved SWP, SWMS or risk assessment.
  5. Safety Observer: During the carrying out of energised electrical work, a Safety Observer with appropriate competency and qualification in relation to the energised electrical work performed must be used.
  6. A safety observer must:
  1. Have knowledge of the task being undertaken;
  2. Be competent in isolation techniques;
  3. Continuously observe the task (and not be distracted by other duties);
  4. Provide emergency assistance and perform a rescue, if needed;
  5. Be current and competent in rescue and Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) through nationally recognised training; and
  6. Be familiar with the location nearest Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) and its operation.
  1. The Safety Observer must be trained in:
  1. Perform rescue from a live LV panel and CPR training and be deemed competent in to rescue and resuscitate a person during energised electrical work emergency (assessed in the previous 12 months); and
  2. The approved Risk Assessment, SWP or SWMS for the energised electrical work and competent in implement control measures during an emergency.
  1. Note: A Safety Observer is not required if the energised electrical work consists of testing only AND the risk assessment shows there is no additional or serious risk (E.g. high or extreme residual risk) associated with the proposed work.
  2. The managers and supervisors of the energised electrical work must also ensure:
  1. Prominent and appropriate warning signs and barriers used to segregate the work area are installed;
  2. Restricted access to the immediate area where the energised electrical work is being conducted is in place. Only persons authorised in the Energised Electrical Work Permit can enter the immediate area;
  3. While electrical work is being carried out on energised electrical equipment, all persons are prevented from creating an electrical risk by inadvertently making contact with an exposed energised component of the equipment. This may need restricted access, provision of instruction and/or signage; and
  4. That they provide information, instruction, training and supervision in accordance with WHSMS Handbook Chapter 3.2 requirements.
  1. The area where the energised electrical work is conducted is defined as a high risk area, a specific Tier 3 induction must be provided when:
  1. All workers involved in carrying out the energised electrical work must be provided information regarding the hazards and risks associated with the work and how to implement the controls (E.g. Hazard and Risk Assessment);
  2. All workers involved in carrying out the energised electrical work must be provided instruction/training on how to carry out the work safely (E.g. the SWMS). This shall also include instruction regarding how work is to be carried out, including the insulating practice used (footwear, clothing covering legs and arms, tools, test probes, insulating mat for conducting surfaces and floor, insulated gloves, eye protection etc.), RCDs on power tools, and minimising contact with metal parts and techniques that minimise the risk of current path through the chest; and
  3. All workers involved in carrying out the energised electrical work must be provided training and instruction in regards to how to properly and correctly use the tools, testing equipment and PPE as well as how to inspect, maintain, store, replace and dispose of such equipment.
  1. If contingency plans or emergency procedures are developed as a result of a risk assessment, the workers carrying out the energised electrical work and the safety observer must be provided training and instruction and have plans and procedures tested prior to conducting the energised electrical work.

Permit to Work

  1. Electrical work on energised electrical installations must comply with the above requirements. A safety observer is required and any electrical work on an energised installation must obtain the Permit to Work from Facilities and Services (F&S) via an F&S Permit Issuer.

Isolation practices

  1. Isolation refers to the separation of hazardous plant and equipment from people, either by distance or by physical barrier. Isolation measures include safety lockout padlocks, lockout jaws/lockout hasp (for up to 6 padlocks) non-conductive circuit breaker lockouts etc.
  2. Isolation and tagging practices communicate the risks involved with the electrical equipment or the installation. Refer to the University’s isolation and danger tagging procedure for further information on isolation and danger tagging processes.

Special electrical installations or equipment – High Voltage

  1. Electrical installations or parts of installations requiring special provisions because of high voltage or the potential presence of an explosive atmosphere shall have:
  1. The details of the special provisions of the installation recorded by F&S; and
  2. The installation and the extent of the special provisions clearly labelled at the site.
  1. There are some areas within the University with systems that require the operation of high voltage switching equipment. Only authorised competent person(s) engaged by Facilities and Services shall work on high voltage equipment.
  2. When working on high voltage electrical systems, there is a risk of electrical arcing even if no contact is made with the exposed, energised part. As a result, the Regulations proclaim exclusion zones. The exclusion zones may not be entered by workers in the vicinity.
  3. If no longer required, the whole of the special electrical installation shall be converted to normal standards, the labelling removed and the change noted in the records.

Section 4: University Electrical Work performed by Contractors

Managing Electrical Contractors

  1. All electrical contractors, whether engaged through Facilities and Services or local areas, must be managed in accordance with WHSMS Handbook Chapter 3.6 requirements. The person engaging the contractor (E.g. the Project Manager) are responsible for ensuring all requirements of Chapter 3.6 are met.
  2. A contractor shall:
  1. Participate in relevant university induction or training;
  2. Be aware of the University’s and local requirements, including the University’s Campus Buildings Requirements Manual (when relevant);
  3. Communicate (in the agreed manner) any WHS issues that may arise;
  4. Immediately report to supervision every injury, exposure, hazard or dangerous incident that occurs while undertaking an activity at the University; and
  5. Take note of WHS updates from their trade association.
  1. Electrical contractors are considered as a minimum NC1 contractors as defined in Chapter 3.6 and must be provided a High Risk Contractor Area Induction prior to work commencing.
  2. Electrical works on energised electrical equipment is strictly prohibited unless provisions in Clause 108 through 113 apply. Where energised electrical works have to be performed, the electrical contractor must comply with the Clause 120 – 126 requirements.
  3. Electrical contractors engaged by Facilities and Services when conducting isolation to electrical systems or working on energised electrical equipment must obtain the relevant General and Individual Permit to Work from a Permit Issuer in Facilities and Services. If the work involves a local area, the work must be communicated with the local area well ahead.
  4. Electrical contractors engaged by local areas are not permitted to isolate or lock out electrical systems except in an emergency situation where there is immediate risk to life and/or plant/property. They shall request a local area electrician to isolate any systems if they need to and the local area electrician is required to seek approval from the management of the local area, if need to, and notify the workers. Electrical contractors engaged by local areas, if absolutely need to work on energised electrical equipment, must obtain Permit to Work through Facilities and Services.

Incident Response and Reporting

  1. While high risk electrical work is carried out and as part of the SWP or SWMS the work area must be able to respond to emergency situations rapidly. An emergency response plan should form part of the preparation for the task. All local area processes, underpinned by this procedure, must include emergency response actions.
  2. Supervisors must be able to identify and action:
  1. First Aid officer location
  2. First Aid kit location
  3. AED location
  4. Electrical isolation switch location
  5. Emergency contacts
  6. Emergency response
  7. Reporting lines

NOTE: All electric shocks are considered Dangerous Incidents as per Section 37(e) Model WHS ACT 2011 and must be reported immediately to WEG.

  1. All workers shall report incidents and hazards immediately to their Supervisor and via Figtree within 48 hours in accordance with WHSMS Handbook Chapter 3.16 requirements.
  2. Any appliance or installation suspected to be involved in the incident should be immediately removed from use, isolated and tagged Out of Service until the hazard has been rectified and then re-commissioned in accordance with this procedure and the isolation and danger tagging procedure.
  3. Where it is known or suspected that a Notifiable Incident may have occurred(refer sections 35-38 Model WHS ACT 2011), the manager or supervisor of the University worker or the Project Manager engaging the contractor must:
  1. Notify Deputy Chief People Officer, Work Environment Group (WEG) immediately in accordance with WHSMS Handbook Chapter 3.16 Section 3.16.2.2 requirements; call the deputy Chief People Officer WEG or, if unavailable, call Manager WHS WEG (02 6125 4338 or 0406 403 025) immediately after you are made aware of the incident; and
  2. Preserve the incident scene IAW Section 39 Model WHS ACT 2011 (e.g. by locking out the area) and must ensure the scene is not disturbed for any reasons (except making safe) until instructed otherwise by the Deputy Chief People Officer WEG.
  1. This procedure is further explained in and supplemented by WHSMS Handbook Chapter 3.9 Plant and Equipment Safety Management.

Electrical Design Certification

  1. Design certification is a process to confirm that electrical equipment complies with relevant Australian safety standards. All new appliances or equipment designed or modified in the University is required to undergo the design / product certification process using the electrical certification form. The template is loaded in Figtree.
  2. Equipment designers are required to have their new designs examined by at least one competent person/s who has successfully completed the University training course ‘Australian design standards for safety in electrical work and equipment’ before construction begins.
  3. The following electrical equipment are required to be certified:
  1. Any electrical equipment that can’t be proven to be compliant with Australian Electrical Safety Standards;
  2. All in-house newly designed and\or built electrical equipment that meets one or more of the following conditions: is supplied by or generates voltages above extra low voltage (>50 VAC or >120 VDC) while delivering currents above 1 mA, or generates high voltages (>1000 VAC or >1500 VDC); and
  3. All repaired or modified electrical equipment, meeting one or more of the preceding conditions.

Items forwarded by any worker for consideration

  1. Particular attention should be paid to the requirements of AS 3100 Approval and test specification – General requirements for electrical equipment. Other standards specific to the prescribed item also need to be considered. For example, much of in-house designed research equipment would require consideration of AS 61010.1 Safety requirements for electrical equipment for measurement, control and laboratory use.

Tagging certified equipment

  1. Item certification shall be recorded and maintained in a register along with any certification documents such as Figtree entries.
  1. All certified equipment will have a durable label fitted with the following information:
  2. University certification number (with the format budget code # - CZZZZZ);
  3. Description (e.g. power supply, heater controller, instrument, etc.);
  4. Model or project number, (identity linked to the item’s documentation); and
  5. Optionally (if space permits): Local Area; date certified; competent person (name and ID number of person certifying the equipment); and the budget code of the department where the equipment was manufactured or the records are kept.

Electrical Competent Persons

  1. The University recognise the following electrical competent persons and their typical activities. Note: Some of the typical activities require General and Individual Permit to Work. They must be obtained before being permitted to conduct these activities.
  2. An electrically competent person is required to:
  1. Only undertake electrical work within the scope defined by their competent person category and approved by management;
  2. Not undertake electrical work outside their area of expertise without guidance from a suitably competent person;
  3. Maintain their professional qualifications and competency, including undertaking relevant University WHS courses;
  4. Maintain knowledge of current safe working procedures in relevant Australian Standards such as AS/NZS 4836 Safe working on low voltage electrical installations and AS/NZS 3760 In-service inspection and testing of electrical equipment. Category 1 competent people shall be familiar with AS/NZS 4836 Safe working on low voltage electrical installations;
  5. Address issues under this procedure for electrical appliances, including the issue, maintenance, repairs and modifications, testing, tagging and registering of such appliance, the safety of such appliance, and its compliance with the rules and codes of relevant regulatory bodies and Australian Standards;
  6. Observe safe electrical work procedures;
  7. Eliminate or minimise risks when working with or on electrical equipment or the electrical installation; and
  8. Be familiar with the location of available Automatic External Defibrillators (AED).

Table 2 - Electrical Competent Persons


Competent person category

Description

HRMS code

Assessment criteria

1A

Unrestricted licensed electrician formally inducted through Facilities and Services to work on the electrical installation, including assessing electrical equipment risk.

ELEC

Assess by all of the below:

Copy of valid electrician's licence for the jurisdiction they are working in.

ANU WHS Risk Management Training (Every 5 years).

Isolate Lock Out – Tag Out Training (Every 3 years).

Electrical Appliance Testing (if required to conduct testing and tagging).

CPR Certificate (Every year).

1B

Unrestricted licensed electrical contractor (usually the period contractor) formally inducted and contracted through Facilities and Services to work on the electrical installation.

ELCL

Assess by all of the below:

Copy of valid electrician's licence for the jurisdiction they are working in.

ACT electrician's licence – Unrestricted.

ANU Contractor WHS Induction.

High Risk Contractor Area Induction.

Current CPR Certificate.

2

Qualified electronics person approved by the Director (or nominee) to work on electrical equipment, to assess electrical equipment risk and to undertake routine inspection, testing, tagging and registering of electrical equipment.

ELSC

Assess by all of the below:

A recognised diploma or degree in electrical\electronic engineering with more than 4 years’ experience as an electrical\electronics technician\engineer.

Certificate III electrical\electronic trade with 4 years’ experience as electronics Technician.

Completion of the University’s Electrical Safety course, including in-service appliance testing (note: guidance is given in University's Electrical Safety training notes as per AS\NZS 3760: Clause 1.4.5 on what a competent person is expected to know for testing).

Current resuscitation certificate by a recognised provider.

Completion of the University course on ‘Australian design standards for safety in electrical equipment’.

3

Trained person or person in training, approved by the Director (or nominee) to work on electrical equipment who routinely designs, modifies or repairs electrical equipment (under technical supervision of a category 1A or 2 competent person).

SETP

Assess by all of the below:

Certificate III (or higher) electrical\electronic trade.

Current resuscitation certificate by a recognised provider.

Completion of the University’s Electrical Safety, including in-service appliance testing and evidence of extensive experience testing typical electrical equipment used in the University (Note guidance is given in AS\NZS 3760 Clause 1.4.5 on what a competent person is expected to know for testing).

Completion of the University’s course on "Australian design standards for safety in electrical work and equipment".

4A

Trained person approved by the Director (or nominee) to assess electrical equipment risk and to undertake routine inspection, testing, tagging and registering of electrical equipment.

EAST

Assess by all of the below:

Test and tag Training.

ANU Risk Management.

Completion of the University’s Electrical Safety course, including in-service appliance testing and evidence of extensive experience testing typical electrical equipment used in the University (note: guidance is given in AS\NZS 3760 Clause 1.4.5 on what a competent person is expected to know for testing).

Current resuscitation certificate by a recognised provider.

4B

Testing contractor (usually the period contractor) or one approved by the Director (or nominee) to assess electrical equipment risk and to undertake routine inspection, testing, tagging and registering of electrical equipment.

Assess by all of the below:

Test and tag Training.

Completion of the University’s Electrical Safety course, including in-service appliance testing and evidence of extensive experience testing typical electrical equipment used in the University (note: guidance is given in AS\NZS 3760 Clause 1.4.5 on what a competent person is expected to know for testing).

Current resuscitation certificate by a recognised provider.

Completion of the Facilities and Services contractor induction.

5A

Tradesperson holding a restricted electrical licence, formally inducted by Facilities and Services or approved by a Director (or nominee) to disconnect\reconnect electrical equipment to the electrical installation according to the specific conditions of their restricted electrical licence.

RELE

Assess by all of the below:

Copy of valid restricted electrician's licence for the jurisdiction they are working in.

ANU Risk Management.

Current resuscitation certificate by a recognised provider.

5B

Trades contractor holding a restricted electrical licence, usually the period contractor or one approved by the Director (or nominee) to disconnect\reconnect electrical equipment to the electrical installation according to the specific conditions of their restricted electrical licence.

Assess by all of the below:

Copy of valid restricted electrician's licence for the jurisdiction they are working in.

Completion of the Facilities and Services contractor induction.

Current resuscitation certificate by a recognised provider.

6

Qualified person certified and formally inducted through Facilities and Services to operate High Voltage power equipment in accordance with the terms and conditions of the certifying authority.

OHVE

Assess by all of the below:

Qualifications listed for Category 1or 2 and,

Copy of their Statement of Attendance at a recognised training provider e.g. (Energy Australia or Country Energy).

7

Safety Observer

Perform Rescue From a LV Panel Training (Every Year) and CPR (Every Year)

ELVR

Training in Low Voltage Rescue – E.g. a current certificate in Isolation and resuscitation techniques (perform rescue from a live LV panel and CPR).

Category and description

Completed Training

Typical Activities

Electrician

HRMS Code ELEC

Electrician's licence – Unrestricted.

ANU WHS Risk Management Training (Every 5 years).

Isolate Lock Out – Tag Out Training (Every 3 years).

Electrical Appliance Testing (if required to conduct testing and tagging).

Australian design standards for safety in electrical work and equipment training (if required to do Design Certification).

Current CPR Certificate.

Electrical works.

Energised electrical works.

Electrical system isolation.

Isolation lockout/tag out (once completed the training).

Electrical testing and tagging (if completed the training).

Electronics Technicians

Electrical Contractors

HRMS Code ELCL

Electrician's licence – Unrestricted.

ANU Contractor WHS Induction.

High Risk Contractor Area Induction.

Current CPR Certificate.

Electrical works.

Energised electrical works.

Electrical system isolation (F&S engaged contractors only).

Isolation lockout/tag out (once completed the training) (F&S engaged contractors only).

Safety Observers

HRMS Code

ELVR

Trained and competent as per Table 2

  • Recognised Training to Electronics Certificate III and/or Certificate IV
  • Completion of external RTO training and certification on in-service appliance testing
  • Australian design standards for safety in electrical work and equipment training (if required to do Design Certification).
  • Perform Rescue From a LV Panel Training (Every Year)
  • CPR Training (Every Year).

Safety observing during energised electrical work.

Implementing controls during an emergency.

Rescue and resuscitate workers performing energised electrical works.

Initiate emergency procedures or contingency plans.

NOTE: Mutual recognition laws applied from 1 July 2021. Now the majority of interstate licence holders may work freely in ACT and vice versa.

Information

Printable version (PDF)
Title Electrical safety management
Document Type Procedure
Document Number ANUP_000572
Version
Purpose To describe how the Australian National University (ANU) manages electrical safety.
Audience Staff
Category Administrative
Topic/ SubTopic Health, Safety & Environment - Occupational Health & Safety
 
Effective Date 28 Aug 2022
Next Review Date 29 Aug 2027
 
Responsible Officer: Chief People Officer
Approved By: Chief Operating Officer
Contact Area Safety and Wellbeing
Authority: National Self-Insurer WHS Audit Tool
Work Health and Safety Regulations 2011
Work Health & Safety Act 2011
Delegations 0

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