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Procedure: Electrical safety management

Purpose

The University has developed this electrical safety procedure to ensure the safe and reliable supply and use of electricity within the University and to ensure the University manages risks to health and safety associated with electrical hazards.

Definitions

Appliance see ‘electrical appliance’.

Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) is an automatic device used to provide an electric shock to the heart, with the intent of returning it to a normal rhythm.

Budget Unit refers to a College, School, Faculty, Division, Department, Cost Centre or Unit designated by the Vice-Chancellor as responsible for an activity of the University.

Competent Person is a person with the necessary practical and theoretical skills (acquired through training, qualification, experience or a combination of these) to correctly perform tasks within the scope of electrical work approved by management. Management must nominate the person against the categories in the Competent Persons section.

Electrical appliance is an electricity consuming device or apparatus (including the cord) that is connected to or capable of being connected to the electrical installation. The term includes both electrical and electronic equipment. An electrical appliance is a sub set of electrical equipment.

Electrical equipment – (from the Regulations) means any apparatus, appliance, cable, conductor, fitting, insulator, material, meter or wire that:

  • is used for controlling, generating, supplying, transforming or transmitting electricity at a voltage greater than extra-low voltage; or
  • is operated by electricity at a voltage greater than extra-low voltage; or
  • is part of an electrical installation located in an area in which the atmosphere presents a risk to health and safety from fire or explosion;
  • but not part of a motor vehicle.

Electrical installation means a group of items of electrical equipment that:

  • are permanently electrically connected together; and
  • can be supplied with electricity from the works of an electricity supply authority or from a generating source.

The electrical installation is the electricity supply to a building, and includes the main switchboard; distribution switchboards, sub-switchboards and all associated fixed wiring including final sub-circuits, such as socket-outlets, isolation switches, lights, etc.

Electrical wiring work is the actual physical work of installing, altering, repairing, replacing or adding to the electrical installation, including the supervision of such work.

Electrical work - means:

  • connecting electricity supply wiring to electrical equipment or disconnecting electricity supply wiring from electrical equipment; or
  • installing, removing, adding, testing, replacing, repairing, altering or maintaining electrical equipment or an electrical installation.

Emergency procedures are procedures established prior to an incident, containing actions to be taken in the event of an emergency. They are utilised in order to minimise the effects of an incident causing damage to people, property or the environment.

Extra-low voltage - extra low voltage (not exceeding 50 V a.c. or 120V ripple free d.c.), as defined in AS/NZS 3000: Australian/New Zealand Wiring Rules

Hostile operating environments – are environments where

  • the normal use of electrical equipment exposes the equipment to operating conditions that are likely to result in damage to the equipment or a reduction in its expected life span, including conditions that involve exposure to moisture, heat, vibration, mechanical damage, corrosive chemicals or dust
  • electrical equipment is moved between different locations in circumstances where damage to the equipment or to a flexible electricity supply cord is reasonably likely
  • electrical equipment is frequently moved during its normal use
  • electrical equipment forms part of, or is used in connection with, an amusement device.

Live part (modified from AS3000) is a conductor or conductive part intended to be energized in normal use, including a neutral conductor and conductive parts connected to a neutral conductor. See AS3000 for items not considered live parts under the multiple earthed neutral (MEN) earthing system.

Low voltage means an operating voltage that exceeds extra-low voltage (ELV), but not exceeding 1000V a.c. or 1500V d.c. as defined in AS/NZS 3000 Australian/New Zealand Wiring Rules.

Places of accommodation include the halls of residences.

Places of work and public spaces, include all laboratory, teaching, office, libraries, recreational spaces, University operated catering facilities, and University buildings (noting exclusions).

Residual Current Device is a safety switch that reduces the risk of electrocution. A RCD must have a tripping current that does not exceed 30 milliamps if electricity is supplied to the equipment through a socket outlet not exceeding 20 amps.

Safe Work Method Statement (SWMS) must:

  • identify the electrical work; and
  • specify hazards associated with that electrical work and risks associated with those hazards; and
  • describe the measures to be implemented to control the risks; and
  • describe how the risk control measures are to be implemented, monitored and reviewed.

(electrically) Unsafe – electrical equipment or a component of electrical equipment is unsafe if there are reasonable grounds for believing it to be unsafe.

WHS – Work Health and Safety

Procedure

Principles

  1. This procedure incorporates the following electrical safety management requirements:
  • Electrical work undertaken at all ANU campuses shall comply with all relevant Commonwealth, State and Territory legislation, Codes of Practice and Australian Standards.
  • All electrical work on the University’s electrical installations shall also comply with the University’s Electrical Services requirements within the Campus Buildings Requirements Manual.
  • See: University’s Campus Buildings Requirements Manual
  • Electrical work shall only be undertaken by a competent person assigned the appropriate category.
  • Electrical infrastructure and equipment will meet or exceed relevant regulations, standards and industry requirements.
  • Electrical appliances shall be inspected, tested and tagged based on the level of risk associated with their use. Variations and exemptions may apply – see below for details.
  • Electrical and electronic equipment designed and manufactured within the University shall be designed, inspected and tested by competent people, according to relevant standards or industry requirements.
  • See: General Safety Guidelines in the Design and Construction of Electrical Equipment
  • Work on ‘live’ electrical installations, equipment and appliances is to be avoided whenever practical.
  1. General safety hints are available for users of electrical appliances.

See: ANU Brochure 'Electrical Safety - Be Safe with Electricity

Contents

  • Exclusions
  • Responsibilities
  • Electrical Safety Management
  • Electrical installation or infrastructure
  • Special electrical installations or equipment – High Voltage
  • Electrical work
  • Isolation practices
  • Working live requirements – installation
  • Working live requirements - equipment
  • Electrical appliances
  • Inspection, testing and tagging of appliances
  • Appliance risk levels
  • Privately-owned electrical appliances
  • ANU Electrical design certification
  • Tagging certified equipment
  • Electrical awareness, induction and training
  • Electrical inspection and audits
  • Electrical safety issues
  • Reporting faulty or damaged equipment
  • Audits
  • Hazard and Incident reporting
  • Record keeping
  • References

Exclusions

  1. Within the University site boundaries there are a few special leased areas where private entities own and/or maintain their own buildings. These buildings are exempt from this procedure. However, as users of these facilities, University staff and students expect the same level of electrical safety to that provided by ANU. University appliances within these buildings are covered by this Procedure.
  2. The following are excluded from the University’s requirements under this procedure:
  • privately owned electrical appliances in short-term serviced accommodation facilities such as Judith Wright Court or University House;
  • privately owned electrical appliances in long-term accommodation, and self-contained and domestic houses or units. However, all ANU supplied electrical appliances in ANU owned residential facilities are to be inspected, tested and tagged. It is a requirement that all electrical appliances in long-term accommodation be visually inspected. It is strongly recommended that high-risk appliances (for example, heaters and cooking appliances) be tested and tagged;
  • concessional areas of the University such as banks, restaurants etc.,
  • electrical appliances of a temporary nature electrically assessed as part of a hire agreement;
  • mobile phone chargers, and laptop power supplies meeting Australian standards, design and voltage requirements, that have also undergone and passed regular visual inspection. The visual inspection process is outlined in paragraph 59.

Responsibilities

  1. This section describes the responsibilities for:
  • Directors, or nominated representatives
  • College and service division building managers or equivalent
  • Staff who engage or manage electrical contractors
  • Research group leaders and Supervisors
  • Staff and students
  • Electrical competent persons
  • Safety observers
  • Contractors and sub-contractors
  • Electrical contractors and sub-contractors
  • Facilities and Services
  • Electrical Safety Committee, and
  • Work Environment Group

Director or nominated representative

  1. The Director (or nominated representative) is responsible for:
  • all non-installation electrical equipment (such as appliances, cord sets, power boards, etc.) in their building space or issued to their employees
  • providing sufficient resources for electrical safety maintenance and undertakings
  • ensuring a risk management approach towards electrical safety
  • empowering supervisors and management to deal with electrical safety within their areas
  • informing staff of their responsibilities under this Procedure
  • actively practising and developing proper attitudes toward work health and safety (WHS), electrical safety and being receptive and responsive to WHS concerns in their area, and
  • participating in workplace WHS inspections.

Building Managers or equivalent

  1. Building Managers or equivalent are responsible for:
  • appointing a competent electrical contract supervisor and/or project officer to supervise and manage electrical contractors
  • nominating and authorising competent people under the categories in this procedure.

Note. A person’s competencies must meet the requirements of the category and allocated tasks.

  • ensuring the University’s Campus Buildings Requirements Manual electrical issues are complied with
  • ensuring a risk management approach for electrical safety
  • promoting, maintaining and facilitating electrical safety in the workplace
  • ensuring that electrical safe work procedures are developed and provided to staff, and that staff understand and comply with them
  • informing users of their responsibilities under these procedures
  • ensuring there is an appropriate assessment of equipment, operation or activity, and location to identify hazards and that associated risks are minimised using documented risk management processes
  • addressing the issue, maintenance, repairs and modifications, testing, tagging and registering of electrical appliances
  • ensuring records of electrical appliances (an electrical appliance register with tests results) are maintained and accessible to staff. A register of locally designed, manufactured and certified electrical equipment must also be kept.

See: ANU Electrical Design Certification section below

  • taking actions to remove or reduce electrical risks, including reviewing any residual risk, and documenting all actions to reduce the level of risk
  • actively practising and developing proper attitudes toward electrical safety and being receptive and responsive to WHS concerns in their area
  • ensuring clear access to and around local electrical distribution boards
  • providing access to an Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) when energised work is conducted
  • participating in workplace inspections, and
  • reporting (in a timely manner) every injury, exposure, hazard or dangerous incident that occurs at the University or while undertaking a University activity.

Staff who engage or manage electrical contractors

  1. The Contractor liaison officer shall:
  • use Facilities and Services accredited electrical contractors to work on the building’s electrical installation. Where this is not possible, they shall ensure the proper induction is completed and documented
  • ensure that before commencing, an induction process is completed formalising the University’s expectations, standards, site rules and service agreements. The Facilities and Services Division Contractor Induction is recommended.
  • ensure that risk management processes are followed and documented
  • record the electrical contractor(s) qualifications, licence details, training (if relevant), and/or certificate(s) of competence required for the service
  • monitor electrical contractors and services provided and maintain communication
  • ensure electrical service tasks are supervised, inspected, monitored and quality is according to the contractual agreement
  • ensure completion of prescribed statutory and organisational documentation associated with the electrical service(s) provided. eg where applicable a Certificate of Electrical Safety is provided/receipted
  • ensure any sub-contracting of electrical work is officially noted, authorised and agreed to. Any sub-contractors are to complete induction checks
  • allow access to an Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) when energised work is conducted
  • report (in a timely manner) every injury, exposure, hazard or dangerous incident that occurs while undertaking electrical work at the University.

Research Group Leaders and Supervisors

  1. Research Group Leaders and Supervisors are responsible for:
  • ensuring their staff undertake any compulsory and recommended electrical safety training
  • ensuring an assessment of equipment, operation or activity, and location are assessed to identify hazard(s) and that risks are minimised
  • ensuring that electrical safe work procedures are developed, provided to, understood and observed by staff
  • ensuring that safe work procedures include consideration of electrical safety issues
  • ensuring a risk management approach for electrical safety
  • promoting, maintaining and facilitating electrical safety in the workplace
  • informing their staff and students of their responsibilities under these procedures
  • taking actions to eliminate or reduce electrical risks; including reviewing any residual risk(s) with controls in place and documenting the risk judgement
  • actively practising and developing proper attitudes toward WHS, electrical safety and being receptive and responsive to WHS concerns in their area
  • participating in workplace WHS inspections, and
  • reporting (in a timely manner) every injury, exposure, hazard or dangerous occurrence that occurs at the University or whilst undertaking a University activity.

Staff, students and visitors

  1. Staff, students and visitors must:
  • read and comply with electrical safety information and any instructions provided

See: ANU Brochure 'Electrical Safety - Be Safe with Electricity', Electrical Safety and You, for extra information.

  • only use electrical appliances that have passed a visual inspection. Those items with a ‘failed’ test tag, danger tag or similar must not be used
  • check that electrical appliances have a current test tag attached before use. If no tag is attached or if the equipment is overdue for inspection, testing and tagging, it is the user's responsibility to:
  • visually inspect the appliance (any damaged equipment must be repaired, tested and tagged before use) and
  • check if the appliance needs testing and tagging, and
  • if it does, then bring the appliance to the attention of their supervisor, a competent person, or management.
  • ensure the equipment is set up correctly and used according to safe operating instructions or recommended practices
  • never repair, modify, or interfere with electrical equipment
  • never interference with by-pass isolation devices, marker tags or labels on electrical equipment. Interference of danger tags used by other people constitutes a very serious offence, which will lead to disciplinary action
  • be aware of the basic electrical safety features of their equipment
  • do all that is reasonably practicable to ensure their actions or omissions do not create or increase adverse risk to the health and safety of themselves or others
  • correctly use safety devices and maintain personal protective equipment
  • only use appropriate Electrical Portable Outlet Device (EPOD, i.e. power boards). EPODs must have overload protection and an Australian approval marking. "Low-cost" and, by implication, low quality EPODs should be avoided especially for high usage items
  • double adaptors are not permitted at the University as they have no overload protection
  • plugs with integral outlet sockets (piggy back plugs) are to be avoided
  • travel adaptors must have an Australian approval marking.
  • report (in a timely manner) every injury, exposure, hazard or dangerous incident that occurs at the University or while undertaking a University activity.

Electrically competent persons

See: categories of competent person at the end of this document.

  1. An electrically competent person is required to:
  • only undertake electrical work within the scope defined by their competent person category and approved by management
  • refuse to undertake electrical work outside their area of expertise without guidance from a suitably competent person
  • maintain their professional qualifications and competency, including:
  • undertaking the relevant University WHS training courses
  • being familiar with current safe working procedures in relevant Australian Standards such as AS/NZS 4836 Safe working on low voltage electrical installations and AS/NZS 3760 In-service inspection and testing of electrical equipment. Category 1 competent people shall be familiar with AS/NZS 4836 Safe working on low voltage electrical installations.
  • address issues under this procedure for electrical appliances, including the issue, maintenance, repairs and modifications, testing, tagging and registering of such appliance, the safety of such appliance, and its compliance with the rules and codes of relevant regulatory bodies and Australian Standards
  • do all that is reasonably practicable to ensure that their actions or omissions do not create or increase adverse risk to the health and safety of themselves or others
  • observe safe electrical work procedures
  • eliminate or minimise risks when working with or on electrical equipment or the electrical installation
  • use equipment according to safe work instructions or recognised practices
  • be familiar with the location of available Automatic External Defibrillators (AED)
  • take note of WHS updates provided by their trade association
  • inform management of electrical hazards they identify during their work
  • report (in a timely manner) every injury, exposure, hazard or dangerous incident that occurs at the University or while undertaking a University activity.

Safety observer

  1. A safety observer is a Category 1 or 2 Competent Person assigned and specifically trained on responsibilities to observe and provide warning against the unsafe approach to exposed electrical equipment, including energised (live) conductors and other potential risks.
  2. A safety observer must:
  • be knowledgeable of the task at hand
  • be competent in isolation techniques
  • continuously observe the task (and not be distracted by other duties)
  • give appropriate warnings
  • provide emergency assistance and perform a rescue, if needed
  • be current and competent in rescue and cardio pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) through nationally recognised training, and
  • know how to access the nearest Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) and its operation
  1. A safety observer is not required if the work consists only of testing, and the conducted risk assessment shows there is no serious risk associated with the proposed work.

Contractors and sub-contractors

  1. A contractor shall:
  • participate in relevant university induction or training
  • be aware of the University’s and local requirements, including the University’s Campus Buildings Requirements Manual (when relevant).
  • communicate (in the agreed manner) any WHS issues that may arise
  • report (in a timely manner) every injury, exposure, hazard or dangerous incident that occurs while undertaking an activity at the University and
  • take note of WHS updates from their trade association.
  1. Before being accepted on a University site, a contractor’s electrical equipment shall have a valid test tag or be inspected, tested and tagged in accordance with:
  • AS\NZS 3760:2010 In-service safety inspection and testing of electrical equipment

Electrical contractors and sub-contractors

  1. An electrical contractor or sub-contractor is required to:
  • meet the requirements for a contractor (see above)
  • employ safe systems of work
  • use appropriate equipment for the task, ensuring that any testing equipment is suitably calibrated
  • provide and discuss documented safe work method statements with the contractor liaison officer and/or Facilities and Services before work starts
  • aid compliance with this procedure and those of relevant Regulatory Authorities
  • comply with AS\NZS 3012:2010 Electrical Installations - Construction and demolition sites where appropriate
  • comply with the University’s Campus Buildings Requirements Manual.

Facilities and Services

  1. The Director Facilities and Services (or nominee) is responsible for the electrical installation in all buildings, including the provision, maintenance, repair, alterations and additions to the electrical installation, the safety of such installation, and its compliance with the rules and codes of the relevant Electrical Regulating Authority and relevant Australian Standards and codes of practice.
  2. The Director, Facilities and Services or nominee shall:
  • nominate competent people in accordance with the competent person categories, ensuring that their competencies meet the requirements of the task undertaken

See: Competent person section at the end of this document

  • monitor electrical contractors and services provided, and maintain communication
  • ensure electrical service tasks are supervised, inspected, and monitored, and quality is according to the contractual agreement
  • educate and encourage compliance with the University’s Campus Buildings Requirements Manual.
  • ensure completion of prescribed statutory and organisational documentation associated with the electrical service(s) provided, eg where applicable, provide a Certificate of Electrical Safety
  • ensure any sub - sub contracting of electrical work is officially noted and approved. Any sub-contractors are to complete the Facilities and Services’ induction
  • ensure all Facilities and Services competent people are registered on the HRMS database
  • ensure that competent people they authorise:
  • undertake appropriate induction
  • have appropriate qualifications, licence (State and/or Territory) and experience for the nominated tasks
  • undertake a risk assessment before undertaking a task
  • use appropriate work practices to effectively control the assessed risks.
  • undertake inspections of the electrical installation
  • investigate electrical incidents, especially those associated with the installation
  • take note of WHS updates provided by trade associations.

Electrical Safety Committee

  1. The Electrical Safety Committee is a sub-committee of the WHS Policy Committee. This committee provides expert advice on electrical safety issues. Additional information is available in the terms of reference for the Committee.

See: Electrical Safety Committee, Terms of Reference

Work Environment Group

  1. The Work Environment Group, Human Resources Division will facilitate WHS information, relevant Australian Standards, training, registering competent persons and audit activities associated with this procedure.

Electrical Safety Management

  1. Electrical safety management includes sections on:
  • electrical installation or infrastructure
  • Residual Current Devices and emergency stops switches.
  • special installations or equipment – High Voltage
  1. Unsafe electrical equipment in the workplace must not be used. An unsafe appliance must be isolated from the electricity supply and not reconnected until it is repaired or tested and found to be safe, otherwise it should be permanently removed from use.

Electrical installation and infrastructure

  1. The following principles shall apply to all electrical installation and infrastructure.
  2. Only electricians with an unrestricted licence (Category 1) shall undertake work on electrical installations.

See: Competent person

  1. Main switchboards shall be locked, and access restricted to Category 1A\1B persons and unrestricted licensed electricians authorised by Facilities and Services.
  2. Sub-mains boards shall be locked with similar restricted access to main boards. However, a Facilities/Operations manager may request (and be granted) ongoing access to a sub-main board only after consultation with relevant parties (Facilities and Services, other Category competent person), conducting a risk assessment and documenting the access protocol. The access protocol must be included inside the unlocked sub-main board.
  3. Any significant work on the electrical installation requires the completion of a Certificate of Electrical Safety. A Certificate of Electrical Safety (CES) is:
  • required under Section 6(b) of the Australian Capital Territory Electrical Safety Act 1971, and other State regulations
  • to be completed by the electrician (Category 1A or 1B)
  • to be completed when the electrical installation has been added to or modified, and within 14 days of the work being completed
  • available from the local Electrical Regulating Authority or the Asset Manager, Engineering Services, Facilities and Services, ext. 55943

Note. Completed forms are to be forwarded to the Electrical Regulating Authority, with a copy to the Asset Manager, Engineering Services, Facilities and Services

  • not required where an electrical installation is repaired with no additions or increase in load. However evidence that the installation has been tested as per the requirements of AS/NZS 3017:2007 Electrical Installations – Verification guidelines shall be recorded and provided to the facility manager or contractor liaison officer.
  1. A safe distance must be maintained from overhead and underground electrical lines. When access close to these services is required a risk assessment must be conducted and suitable control measures put in place to protect people and minimise the risk of electrocution.

See: Facilities and Services procedure: Permission to excavate and penetrate surfaces on the property of the Australian National University

Residual Current Devices (RCD)

  1. Residual Current Devices (RCD) are required to protect socket outlets in hostile operating environments. This includes university laboratories and workshops. An RCD is not required if:
  • the supply of electricity to the electrical equipment does not exceed 50 volts alternating current (ac)
  • is direct current (dc)
  • is provided through an isolating transformer that provides at least an equivalent level of protection or
  • is provided from a non-earthed socket outlet supplied by an isolated winding portable generator that provides at least an equivalent level of protection.
  1. RCDs must be tested regularly by a competent person to ensure that the devices are operating effectively. A record of all testing of an RCD (other than any daily testing eg on a cord set) must be kept until the device is next tested or the device is permanently removed from use. The University will use a programme of random testing to demonstrate a high level of safety protection.

Note. Laboratories with a specific requirement for non-RCD protected socket outlets should discuss their requirement with Facilities and Services, who will provide appropriate “Non RCD Protected” labels at each socket. In general, all socket outlets in laboratories shall be RCD protected.

Emergency stop switches

  1. Emergency stop switches that isolate the electrical supply should be installed in laboratories and workshops where practical. The emergency switches must be easily accessible and clearly labelled. Emergency stop switches should be tested on commission and thereafter at intervals determined by Area management in consultation with Facilities and Services.

Special electrical installations or equipment – High Voltage

  1. Electrical installations or parts of installations requiring special provisions because of high voltage or the potential presence of an explosive atmosphere shall have,
  • the details of the special provisions of the installation recorded by Facilities and Services, and
  • the installation and the extent of the special provisions clearly labelled at the site.
  1. There are some areas within the University with systems that require the operation of high voltage switching equipment. Only authorised competent person (category 6B) shall work on or near high voltage equipment.
  2. When working on high voltage electrical systems, there is a risk of electrical arcing even if no contact is made with the exposed, energised part. As a result, the Regulations proclaim exclusion zones. The exclusion zones may not be entered by anyone working in the vicinity.
  3. If no longer required, the whole of the special electrical installation shall be converted to normal standards, the labelling removed and the change noted in the records.

Electrical Work

  1. Electrical work includes sections on:
  • Isolation practices
  • Working live requirements – installations
  • Working live requirements – equipment
  1. All work on electrical equipment shall only be undertaken by competent persons from Categories 1A\B, 2, 3, 5A\B

See: Competent person section below

  1. Any electrical equipment failing design principles, as judged by a competent person, shall be subjected to the University’s Design Certification process.

See: ANU Design Certification section below

  1. All in-house designed, manufactured and\or modified electrical equipment that uses or generates voltages above extra low voltage ( >50 Vac or >120 Vdc) shall be subjected to, and approved under, the University’s Design Certification process for electrical equipment before being placed into service.

See: ANU Design Certification section below

  1. Work on electrical equipment shall be done in compliance with relevant Australian Standards. Attention is also drawn to the University’s ‘General safety guidelines in the design and construction of electrical equipment’.

See: General Safety Guidelines in the Design and Construction of Electrical Equipment.

  1. Work on electrical equipment should be carried out with the power disconnected and\or the system de-energised. Where work is required on energised equipment the ‘working live requirements’ must be followed. The assessed risk will dictate the work procedures to be followed to minimise the risk from the hazard. Work will not be undertaken where the risk cannot be adequately controlled.

See: Working live requirements below

See: Working on Live Electrical Equipment Checklist

Also relevant: Working on the Electrical Installation

  1. As a rule,
  • electrical work on energised electrical equipment is only permitted with specific safeguards detailed in the sections below
  • before electrical work commences, the equipment must be tested by a competent person to ensure it is not energised
  • each exposed part is treated as energised until it is isolated or determined not to be energised
  • each high-voltage exposed part must be earthed after being de-energised.

Isolation practices

  1. Isolation and tagging practices communicate the risks involved with the electrical equipment or the installation. Isolation of the equipment ensures that it is de-energised and work can commence. The two type of tags used are:
  • ‘Danger’ tags to indicate that certain circuits, switches, equipment, etc. must not be operated as operation would create a hazardous situation that may result in injury, death or damage to equipment. A danger tag is used when personnel are working on appliances, equipment, plant, machinery or electrical installation. Interference to danger tags constitutes a very serious offence that will lead to disciplinary action.
  • ‘Out of Service’ tags are placed onto machinery/equipment by anyone who considers the equipment to be unsafe, unserviceable or requiring repair.
  1. Tags should include details of:
  • the person and their contact details supported by their signature and date
  • why the equipment has been taken out of service and how it has been disconnected, for example by removal of a key or any other starting device or a device installed to effect inoperability.
  1. Tags should be placed onto the electrical cord adjacent to the electrical plug or isolating device.
  2. Multiple tags on a multiple lockout device shall be used when more than one person is working on the same equipment.
  3. More information on isolation and danger tagging processes are available in the University’s procedure.

See: isolation and danger tagging procedure

Working live requirements - Installation

  1. Electrical work on energised electrical installation must only be conducted by a competent person (category 1) who has the appropriate tools, testing equipment and personal protective equipment according to the developed and approved safe work method statement.
  2. A safety observer is also required. The role of the safety observer must be discussed.
  3. Electrical work on energised installation must also adhere to the ‘working live requirements - equipment’ (see below) and be accompanied by a signed authorisation from the Director, Facilities and Services or (nominee) on the Working on the Electrical Installation documentation.

See: Working on the Electrical Installation

  1. All tools, testing equipment and other implements used shall be of an approved type in good order and visually inspected prior to use, where necessary tested and regularly maintained. Test equipment for working on electrical installation energised (live) should meet the requirements of HB 187 and the voltage categories of AS/NZS 61010.

Working live requirements - Equipment

  1. Working on energised electrical equipment is only permitted when:
  • it is in the interests of health and safety that the electrical work is carried out on the equipment while the equipment is energised. For example, it may be necessary that life-saving equipment remain energised and operating while electrical work is carried out
  • it is necessary that the electrical equipment to be worked on is energised in order for the work to be carried out properly
  • it is necessary for the purposes of testing or
  • there is no reasonable alternative means of carrying out the work.
  1. Electrical work on energised electrical equipment must only be conducted by a competent person (category 1, 2, 5) who has the appropriate tools, testing equipment and personal protective equipment according to the developed and approved safe work method statement. A Safety Observer is also required.
  2. Before commencing electrical work on energised electrical equipment:
  • all means of de-energising the installation or equipment must be considered and deemed inappropriate
  • a risk assessment must be conducted in relation to the proposed electrical work.

See: Working on the Electrical Installation

  1. Note, where the risk of working on the energised (live) electrical equipment is assessed to be of high to extreme risk and cannot be effectively controlled, the work shall not be undertaken.
  2. the area where the electrical work is to be carried out is clear of obstructions so as to allow for easy access and exit
  3. the point at which the electrical equipment can be disconnected or isolated from its electricity supply is:
  • clearly marked or labelled and
  • clear of obstructions so as to allow for easy access and exit by the worker who is to carry out the electrical work or any other competent person and
  • capable of being operated quickly and
  • discussed with the worker and safety observer.
  1. Must consult with management or the person in control of the workplace and obtain authorisation. During that consultation, the following must be discussed:
  • how the work is to be carried out, including insulating practice that shall be used (footwear, clothing covering legs and arms, tools, test probes, insulating mat for conducting surfaces and floor, insulated gloves, eye protection etc.), RCDs on power tools, and minimising contact with metal parts and techniques that minimise the risk of current path through the chest (eg work single handed)
  • the safe work method statement for the work
  • prominent and appropriate warning signs and barriers used to segregate the work area
  • the location of readily accessible AEDs and their operation. A list of AEDs can be found in Provision of First Aid Services procedure
  • how, when and what condition the electrical equipment will be returned to service and likely changes

Electrical Appliances

  1. Electrical appliances includes sections on:
  • Inspection, testing and tagging of appliances
  • Appliance risk levels
  • Privately-owned electrical appliances
  • Privately-owned electrical appliances used within the University library and lecture theatres
  1. Electrical appliances shall connect to the electrical installation through an approved socket outlet or through an isolation switch.
  2. Power boards (Electric Portable Outlet Devices, EPODs) where used, shall incorporate a current limiting device (circuit breaker) and, where practical, be mounted with the outlets in the vertical plane and protected from mechanical, electrical or water damage.
  3. Extension cords should only be used as a temporary solution and are not to be installed as fixed wiring.
  4. Double adaptors and similar are NOT to be used in the University, as they have no overload protection.
  5. Uninterruptable power supply (UPS) installation shall only occur after careful consideration of the benefits against the risks, including that of electrocution.

In most cases, any (distribution board) RCD electric shock protection is rendered non-functional at the output side of a UPS. Additional RCD protection may be required at the output of the UPS to maintain protection from electrocution. Different types of UPS earth and neutral arrangements can also affect RCD protection effectiveness.

Any UPS system should be appropriately rated and shall be stored, installed, inspected, tested, monitored and maintained according to the manufacturer’s instructions. UPS battery packs should be replaced according to the manufacturer’s advice.

  1. Emergency stop switches on equipment shall be prominent, clearly and durably marked and immediately accessible to each operator. The stop control cannot be adversely affected by electrical or electronic circuit malfunction. Where the emergency stop is also to remove power to equipment, it must prevent a UPS re-energising the appliance. The stop control function must be of the stop and lock-off type so that the equipment cannot be restarted simply by resetting the emergency switch. The push button must be red.

Inspection, testing and tagging of appliances

  1. Electrical appliances shall be confirmed as safe before being plugged into an electrical socket. To achieve this, the electrical appliances shall undergo the appropriate inspection, testing and tagging.

Inspection

  1. (Visual) Inspection – an appliance should be visually inspected for any abnormalities (to the extent practicable) before being plugged into an electrical socket. If any unusual sign exists do not connect the appliance – send for repair or testing by a competent person.
  • Where it is not practicable for the user to conduct a visual inspection before subsequent uses, then the user, supervisor and/or a competent person should determine an appropriate inspection frequency or schedule.
  • International appliances must be inspected to ensure the voltage, fuses, cables and plugs meet Australian requirements. Appliances that do not meet Australian or University requirements must undergo the University Electrical Design Certification process.
  • A thorough visual inspection is also conducted by a competent person before testing.

Testing

  1. In-service testing – an electrical safety test shall be conducted by a competent person:
  • for appliances to be used in a hostile operating environment - before connecting the appliance to an electrical socket
  • for other environments – as soon as practical
  • regularly according to – the risk management approach given in AS\NZS 3760, or the interval determined by the competent person, or the level of risk given in this procedure (see Appliance Risk Levels below), or the appliance’s manufacturer.
  • following any repair or modifications
  • for all second-hand electrical appliances before entering it into service.
  1. The following appliances do not require in-service testing:
  • all electrical appliances with a negligible risk (see below)
  • all "NEW" electrical appliances displaying Australian or equivalent international approval markings showing it complies with relevant safety standards (eg computers). The manufacturer is considered to be responsible for the item's safety, although the item must be visually inspected and should be tagged before entering service
  • all electrical equipment excluded by the scope of AS/NZS 3760 In-service inspection of electrical equipment including: equipment or appliances which would need to be dismantled to perform the inspection and tests specified in the Standard equipment (such as suspended light fittings) which is at a height of 2.5 m or greater above the ground, floor or platform fixed light fittings (luminaires), electric doors, toilet fans and similar equipment considered part of the building infrastructure stationary equipment/appliances (>18 kg and no carrying handles) connected by a flexible cord or cable which is not flexed during normal use nor exposed to abuse or damage, nor for use in a hostile environment equipment connected by fixed wiring

Note: these items may undergo installation tests.

  • items excluded from the University’s electrical safety requirement found in the exclusions section of this procedure.
  1. An electrical appliance should not be used if it is required to be tested and it has not been tested according to this procedure.

Note: All testing will be performed only with appropriately calibrated (according to manufacturer’s specifications) test equipment. Instrumentation used for in-service testing shall comply with the requirements given in AS\NZS 3760 In-service inspection of electrical equipment. The accuracy of such instrumentation shall be routinely checked, initially and on an annual basis.

Tagging (and registration)

  1. Electrical appliances tested shall be tagged and recorded within an electrical register. The tag should include the:
  • ANU logo
  • appliance ID number (both visual and machine readable)
  • generic appliance description (e.g. power board, desk lamp, drill, instrument, etc.)
  • outcome of the testing
  • last risk classification (by colour coding and retest frequency)
  • last test date
  • competent person who carried out the test (name)
  • next test date
  • provision for dated inspection marks (eg similar to fire extinguisher tags)
  1. Inspection or testing tags should be coloured to identify the assessed risk (For example, Red = high risk; Yellow = medium risk; Green = low risk; Blue = negligible risk).

image

  1. The test information or tag must be kept until the next test or until the appliance is permanently removed from the workplace or disposed of.

Appliance risk levels

  1. To determine the appliance risk level, a Competent person(s) will undertake a risk assessment that includes relevant factors such as:
  • operating and storage environment eg fieldwork, laboratory, office, cold room
  • usage (particularly the movement of the equipment and flexing of the supply cord)
  • appliance and characteristics (function, make and model)
  • experiences with the appliance or equipment
  • age of the appliance or equipment
  • electrical safety knowledge of typical users
  • previous inspection and testing results.
  1. Four risk levels are used within the university:
  • Negligible risk – appliances that need only regular visual inspection. Examples might be refrigerators, air conditioners, rack mounted equipment, equipment fixed in place, equipment rarely moved (and the cord is protected from damage)
  • Low risk – appliances inspected yearly and undergo inspection, testing and tagging at 5 yearly intervals. Examples in non-hostile environments might include: office equipment, computers, fans, desk lamps, equipment where the cord is not subjected to movement or hazards
  • Medium risk – appliances visually inspected bi-monthly and undergo inspection, testing and tagging annually. Examples include: workshop tools, laboratory equipment, equipment on trolleys
  • High risk – appliances that are visually inspected monthly and undergo inspection, testing and tagging 6 monthly. Examples include: equipment in hostile or wet environments, high use (frequently moved) equipment, equipment where the cord is subjected to frequent movement or hazards, fieldwork equipment.

Privately-owned electrical appliances

  1. The use of privately owned electrical appliances in Budget Units (except Halls of Residence and University House) is to be discouraged.
  2. All non ANU-owned electrical appliances (unless exempt) must be inspected, tested and tagged according to AS\NZS 3760 In-service safety inspection and testing of electrical equipment before being used in University workplaces. The cost of testing and tagging by a competent person or external company is to be covered by the appliance owner.
  3. ANU-owned electrical appliances (unless exempt) must be inspected, tested and tagged according to AS\NZS 3760 In-service safety inspection and testing of electrical equipment or this procedure before being used in a residence as part of ‘Home based Work’. The ANU electrical appliance should be returned to the University for re-testing when due.

Privately-owned electrical appliances used within the University library and lecture theatres

  1. The University has provided power outlets, protected by residual current devices, for the use of visitors. Privately-owned electrical appliances (for example, laptop computer or phone charges) may be used at these outlets provided that it complies with the appropriate Australian or international electrical manufacturing standard. The equipment must be inspected and maintained by the owner and be in a safe condition.

ANU Electrical Design Certification

  1. Design certification is a process to confirm that equipment complies with relevant Australian safety standards. All new appliances or equipment designed or modified in the ANU is required to undergo the design certification process.
  2. Equipment designers are required to have their new designs examined by a Category 7 competent person who has successfully completed the ANU training course ‘Australian design standards for safety in electrical work and equipment’ before construction begins.
  3. The following electrical appliances or equipment are required to be certified:
  4. all in-house newly designed and\or built electrical appliances or equipment that meets one or more of the following conditions: consumes power above extra low voltage (i.e. >50 Vac or >120 Vdc), generates voltages above extra low voltage while delivering currents above 1 mA, generates high voltages (>1000 Vac or >1500 Vdc).
  • all repaired or modified electrical equipment, meeting one or more of the above conditions, where the work undertaken may have affected the safety of that equipment
  • all previously in-house designed equipment, meeting one or more of the above conditions, undergoing repairs or modifications
  • all electrical equipment entering the ANU with questionable design or manufacturing issues
  • items forwarded by any electrical competent person for consideration.
  1. Useful guidance in judging compliance with relevant Australian Standards for equipment designed in a research and teaching environment is available in the ANU training course "Australian design standards for safety in electrical work and equipment". Australian Standards are accessible to ANU staff and students through the ANU library database network.

See: training course - Australian design standards for safety in electrical work and equipment

See: ANU library – see the Standards Australia e resource.

  1. Particular attention should be paid to the requirements of AS 3100 Approval and test specification – General requirements for electrical equipment. Other standards specific to the prescribed item need also be considered. For example, much of in-house designed research equipment would require consideration of AS 61010.1 Safety requirements for electrical equipment for measurement, control and laboratory use - Part 1: General requirements. If the equipment generates or uses substantial Radio Frequencies (RF) power then AS 1188 - Radio Transmitters and similar equipment - Safe practices needs to be considered.

Tagging certified equipment

  1. Item certification shall be recorded with the form and maintained in a register.
  2. All certified equipment will have a durable label fitted with the following information:
  • ANU Certificate number (with the format budget code # - CZZZZZ)
  • description (eg power supply, heater controller, instrument, etc.)
  • model or project number, (identity linked to the item’s documentation)
  • and optionally (if space permits) -
  • budget unit
  • date certified
  • competent person (name and ID number of person certifying the equipment)

# the budget code of the department where the equipment was manufactured or the records are kept.

  1. Budget Units are required to maintain a register including the assessment form. The following information is recorded:
  • ANU certificate number
  • Description (eg power supply, heater controller, instrument, etc.)
  • Model, (identity linked to the items documentation)
  • Budget Unit
  • Department (owner)
  • Location of equipment
  • Designer\Modifier (name and Department)
  • Description of work undertaken (brief description of the design or of the modifications in relation to the electrical safety)
  • Date certified
  • Competent person (name and ID number of person certifying the equipment)

Electrical Awareness, Induction and Training

  1. Electrical safety is communicated via awareness information, induction and specialised training courses.

Electrical safety awareness – information on electrical safety is available. Periodically electrical safety information or hazards alerts may be distributed.

See: Electrical brochure - Working safely with electricity

  1. Induction of staff and students working with electricity -
  2. Following on from the occupational health and safety assessment of the position, roles, responsibilities and tasks that were identified in a Pre-Employment Work Environment Report (PEWER) consideration needs to be given to specialised training, knowledge and skills that may be required. Inclusion in the health surveillance program should also be assessed.

See: Pre-Employment Work Environment Report

See: Health Surveillance

Training – Completion of training courses is a pre-requisite for many categories of competent person. Training is available within the University for:

Applicable to

Course

Frequency

Everyone

Local induction

On commencement at ANU to cover general electrical safety awareness

All electrically competent persons

Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)

Annual refresher

(or as part of ‘Perform rescue from a live LV panel and CPR’)

Electrically competent persons, especially categories 1, 2, 4A

ANU Electrical safety including in-service appliance testing (Includes CPR)

Every 2 years

Electrically competent persons, especially categories 7, 3

ANU Electrical – Australian design standards for safety in electrical work and equipment

Every 4 years

Safety Observers, electrically competent persons, especially categories 1, 2, 3, 5

Isolation and resuscitation techniques (Perform rescue from a live LV panel and CPR)

Annual refresher

Contractors

Facilities and Services Contractor Induction

Every 4 years

  1. Full first aid training is strongly encouraged for the electrical trades.

See: WHS training courses

Electrical Safety Issues

Reporting faulty or damaged electrical equipment

  1. If an appliance, equipment or associated wiring is suspected of being unsafe or in a dangerous condition, the equipment (where safe to do so) should be switched off, unplugged and their supervisor, competent person and/or local management notified immediately. An Out of Service tag should be placed on the equipment.

See: Isolation and danger tagging procedure

Workplace Inspections

  1. Regular self-assessments of electrical safety contribute to ongoing electrical safety awareness and improvements. The workplace inspection program is designed to be implemented locally through the WHS Committee members and competent persons.

See: University Audit Program

See: Workplace inspection program

  1. Facilities and Services shall undertake the audit for the electrical installation.
  2. Any sub-standard electrical installation shall be notified to the Facilities and Services Division.
  3. Electrical appliances found to be sub-standard shall be tagged and removed from service, and upgraded to the appropriate standard as soon as reasonably practicable.
  4. Any sub-standard processes shall be notified to the Work Environment Group and dealt with through the electrical safety sub-committee.

Hazard reporting

  1. An ANU hazard report must be submitted when a hazard with electrical appliances, equipment or the installation is identified. The appliance or installation should be taken Out of Service until the hazard has been rectified and then re-commissioned in accordance with this and the isolation and danger tagging procedure.

See: Hazard Report

See: Isolation and danger tagging procedure

Incident notification

  1. For every electrical death, injury, exposure or dangerous incident that occurs, supervisors must ensure that the online WHS Incident Notification form is completed and submitted. Serious incidents should also be notified to the Work Environment Group as soon as possible.

See: WHS Incident Notification

Record Keeping

  1. The following records must be kept
  • a risk assessment for work on energised electrical equipment for at least one month
  • a safe work method statement developed for work on energised electrical equipment for at least one month
  • training achieved for the period of employment (maintained in the HRMS)
  • competency category and authorisations for the period of employment (maintained in the HRMS)
  • inspection and testing results performed on electrical equipment. The information is to be stored on an electrical appliance register. The following information will be recorded: appliance ID number; appliance description (e.g., power board, desk lamp, drill, instrument, etc.); location of the appliance; last risk classification; last test date; competent person (name and ID number); test results (PASS\FAIL, cause of failure, [optional information: values measured, test equipment used, etc.]); and design registration information (see above, if relevant).
  1. A local electrical appliance register may be kept.
  2. Electrical equipment/appliance test information must be accessible to all staff, especially competent persons for use in risk assessments.

References

ANU Specifications

  • Facilities and Services Division, Campus Buildings Requirements Manual, current edition

Relevant Australian Standards Publications

  • Accessible by all University staff and students through the University Library system.
  • AS/NZS 3000:2007 Electrical Installations (known as the Australian/New Zealand Wiring Rules)
  • AS/NZS 3008.1.1:2009 Electrical Installations – Selection of cables – Cables for alternating voltages up to and including 0.6/ 1 kV – Typical Australian installation conditions
  • AS/NZS 3012:2010 Electrical Installations - Construction and demolition sites
  • AS/NZS 3017:2007 Electrical Installations – Verification guidelines
  • AS/NZS 3100:2009 Approval and test specification - General requirements for electrical equipment
  • AS/NZS 3260:1993 Approval and test specification - Safety of information technology equipment including electrical business equipment (incorporating Amendments 1, 2, 3 and 4)
  • AS/NZS 3760:2010 In-service safety inspection and testing of electrical equipment
  • AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009 Risk Management – principles and guidelines
  • AS/NZS 4836:2011 Safe working on or near low-voltage electrical installations and equipment
  • AS 1319:1994 Safety signs for the occupational environment
  • AS 2243.1:2005 Safety in laboratories - Planning and operational aspects
  • AS 2243.7:1991 Safety in laboratories - Electrical aspects
  • AS/NZS 3260:1993 Approval and test specification - Safety of information technology equipment including electrical business equipment (Incorporating Amendments 1, 2, 3 and 4)
  • AS 61010.1:2003 Safety requirements for electrical equipment for measurement, control and laboratory use - General requirements (IEC61010-1:2001,MOD)
  • HB 187 Guide to selecting a safe multimeter, Standards Australia, 2006

Legislation

Commonwealth legislation

  • Work Health and Safety Act 2011
  • Work Health and Safety Regulations 2011 – Electrical (Part 4.7 General Electrical Safety in Workplaces and Energised Electrical Work)

Work Health and Safety Codes of Practice

Model Code of Practice – Managing Electrical Risks in the Workplace, or in legislation

See Comcare web site for WHS legislation

Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Government

Legislation – Construction Occupations Licensing Act (COLA) administered by Construction Occupations Registrar, Australian Capital Territory Planning and Land Authority (ACTPLA) Registered Electrical Workers in ACT. COLA maintains a list of licensed electrical contractors and electricians in the ACT http://www.actpla.act.gov.au/topics/hiring_licensing/employ_professional/electricians Certificate of Electrical Work. COLA requires all work carried out on an electrical installation to be notified within 14 days. Consult the following web page for details of notification, and electronic link. http://www.actpla.act.gov.au/topics/design_build/manage_construction/electrical_work

ACT Legislation. The relevant legislation covering electrical installations in the ACT is Electricity Safety Act 1971. A copy can be obtained from the following web site: http://www.legislation.act.gov.au/a/1971-30/default.asp

New South Wales (NSW)

NSW Legislation. The relevant legislation covering electrical installations in NSW is Electrical Safety Act 1945.

Northern Territory (NT)

The Electrical Workers and Contractors Licensing Board is responsible for issuing electrical licences and consists of members from the electrical industry including government departments, electrical engineering, apprentice training, electrical contracting and electrical workers.

Competent Persons

  1. Categories of Competent Person and their approved scope of electrical work

Competent person category

Description

HRMS code

Assessment criteria

1A

Unrestricted licensed electrician formally inducted through Facilities and Services to work on the electrical installation, including assessing electrical equipment risk.

ELEC

Assess by all of the below:

Copy of their ACT electrician's licence (and confirmed with the local regulator, Construction Occupations Registrar, Australian Capital Territory Planning and Land Authority (ACTPLA) as valid)

Completion of the Facilities and Services contractor induction

Completion of the ANU Electrical Safety course, including in-service appliance testing (note: guidance is given in University's Electrical Safety training notes as per AS/NZS 3760: Clause 1.4.5 on what a competent person is expected to know for testing)

Current resuscitation certificate by a recognised provider

1B

Unrestricted licensed electrical contractor (usually the period contractor) formally inducted and contracted through Facilities and Services to work on the electrical installation.

ELCL

Assess by all of the below:

Copy of their ACT electrician's licence (and confirmed with the local regulator, Construction Occupations Registrar, Australian Capital Territory Planning and Land Authority (ACTPLA) as valid)

Completion of the Facilities and Services contractor induction

Current resuscitation certificate by a recognised provider.

2

Qualified electronics person approved by the Director (or nominee) to work on electrical equipment, to assess electrical equipment risk and to undertake routine inspection, testing, tagging and registering of electrical equipment.

ELSC

Assess by all of the below:

A recognised diploma or degree in electrical\electronic engineering with more than 4 years experience as an electrical\electronics technician\engineer or extensive experience (> 6 years) as an electronics technician,

Completion of the ANU Electrical Safety course, including in-service appliance testing (note: guidance is given in University's Electrical Safety training notes as per AS\NZS 3760: Clause 1.4.5 on what a competent person is expected to know for testing)

Current resuscitation certificate by a recognised provider

Completion of an ANU course on ‘Australian design standards for safety in electrical equipment’

3

Trained person, approved by the Director (or nominee) to work on electrical equipment who routinely designs, modifies or repairs electrical equipment (under technical supervision of a category 1A or 2 competent person).

SETP

Assess by all of the below:

Current resuscitation certificate by a recognised provider

Completion of the ANU Electrical Safety, including in-service appliance testing and evidence of extensive experience testing typical electrical equipment used in the ANU (Note guidance is given in AS\NZS 3760 Clause 1.4.5 on what a competent person is expected to know for testing)

Completion of an ANU course on "Australian design standards for safety in electrical work and equipment"

4A

Trained person approved by the Director (or nominee) to assess electrical equipment risk and to undertake routine inspection, testing, tagging and registering of electrical equipment.

EAST

Assess by all of the below:

Completion of the ANU Electrical Safety course, including in-service appliance testing and evidence of extensive experience testing typical electrical equipment used in the ANU (note: guidance is given in AS\NZS 3760 Clause 1.4.5 on what a competent person is expected to know for testing)

Current resuscitation certificate by a recognised provider

Completion of the Facilities and Services contractor induction

4B

Testing contractor (usually the period contractor) or one approved by the Director (or nominee) to assess electrical equipment risk and to undertake routine inspection, testing, tagging and registering of electrical equipment.

5A

Tradesperson holding a restricted electrical licence (air conditioning mechanic, plumber, mechanical fitter, electrical fitter) formally inducted by Facilities and Services or approved by a Director (or nominee) to disconnect\reconnect electrical equipment to the electrical installation according to the specific conditions of their restricted electrical licence.

RELE

Assess by all of the below:

Copy of their ACT restricted electrician's licence (and confirmed with the local regulator, Construction Occupations Registrar, Australian Capital Territory Planning and Land Authority (ACTPLA) as valid)

Completion of the Facilities and Services contractor induction

Current resuscitation certificate by a recognised provider

5B

Trades contractor holding a restricted electrical licence (eg air conditioning mechanic, plumber, mechanical fitter, electrical fitter) usually the period contractor or one approved by the Director (or nominee) to disconnect\reconnect electrical equipment to the electrical installation according to the specific conditions of their restricted electrical licence.

6A

Unrestricted licensed electrician who has received formal induction and authorisation through Facilities and Services to access ACTEW/AGL electrical sub-stations on University grounds

ESAA

Assess by all of the below:

Copy of their ACT electrician's licence (and confirmed with the local regulator, Construction Occupations Registrar, Australian Capital Territory Planning and Land Authority (ACTPLA) as valid)

Current ACTEW/AGL Certificate in ‘Substation and switch station entry and awareness’ training

Current resuscitation certificate by a recognised provider

6B

Qualified person certified and formally inducted through Facilities and Services to operate High Voltage power equipment in accordance with the terms and conditions of the certifying authority

OHVE

Assess by all of the below:

Copy of their ACT electrician's licence (and confirmed with the local regulator, Construction Occupations Registrar, Australian Capital Territory Planning and Land Authority (ACTPLA) as valid), and\or a recognised diploma or degree in electrical\electronic engineering with more than 4 years experience as an electrical\electronics technician\engineer or extensive experience (> 6 years) as an electronics technician

Copy of their Statement of Attendance at a recognised training provider eg (Energy Australia or Country Energy)

Current resuscitation certificate by a recognised provider

7

A Category 1A or Category 2 Competent Person approved by the Director (or nominee) to Certify electrical equipment.

Comprehensive knowledge of relevant electrical safety design standards together with considerable experience in their practical implementation.

Budget Units lacking suitable competent persons may contract certification from other category 7 persons on campus.

EDSC

Assess by all of the below:

Copy of their ACT electrician's licence (and confirmed with the local regulator, Construction Occupations Registrar, Australian Capital Territory Planning and Land Authority (ACTPLA) as valid), and\or a recognised diploma or degree in electrical\electronic engineering with more than 4 years experience as an electrical\electronics technician\engineer or extensive experience (> 6 years) as an electronics technician

Current resuscitation certificate by a recognised provider

Completion of an ANU course on ‘Australian design standards for safety in electrical work and equipment’

8

Safety Observer

ELVR

A Category 1 or 2 person competent in Low Voltage Rescue – i.e. a current certificate in Isolation and resuscitation techniques (perform rescue from a live LV panel and CPR)

Information

Printable version (PDF)
Title Electrical safety management
Document Type Procedure
Document Number ANUP_000572
Version 11
Purpose The University has developed this electrical safety procedure to ensure the safe and reliable supply and use of electricity within the University and to ensure the University manages risks to health and safety associated with electrical hazards.
Audience Staff
Category Administrative
Topic/ SubTopic Health, Safety & Environment - Occupational Health & Safety
 
Effective Date 21 Mar 2012
Review Date 20 Feb 2015
 
Responsible Officer Director, Human Resources
Approved By: Chief Operating Officer
Contact Area Human Resources Division
Authority