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Procedure: Hazardous waste management procedure

Purpose

To outline the procedure for managing hazardous waste at the Australian National University.

Definitions

This procedure contains the following definitions:

Archived chemical - A research substance that is stored for more than one week in an amount greater than 1 g or 1 mL. Where appropriate, it should also apply to amounts less than 1g or 1 mL.

Control - Anything that is implemented to eliminate or reduce the risk of a hazard causing harm.

Emergency procedures - Basic plans, established in advance, stating what action to take in the event of an emergency. These are used in order to minimise the consequences of an incident, such as injuries, or damage to property or the environment.

Exposure - Occurs when a person, property or the environment comes into contact with a hazard. The four routes of exposure for people are: inhalation, skin absorption, ingestion and inoculation.

Hazard - Anything that has the potential to cause harm (e.g. hydrochloric acid is hazardous because of its corrosive nature and ability to cause burns to living tissues).

Hazardous chemical - Any chemical substance that has the ability to release energy that is harmful to the health or safety of a person or the environment. This definition includes hazardous substances, dangerous goods, and scheduled drugs and poisons.

Health - Freedom from illness or disease.

Health hazard - Anything that can cause illness or disease. Exposure may occur over a short or long period of time.

Material safety data sheet - See Safety Data Sheet.

Occupational Health and Safety - Freedom from injury, illness and disease in the workplace.

Research substance - A substance that is a new chemical, or where there is little known about its physical, chemical, toxicological or health-related properties.

Risk - The likelihood that a hazard will cause harm in the given circumstances (e.g. the risk of receiving a burn from hydrochloric acid is low when it is contained in a sealed bottle; however, this risk is significantly higher when handling an acid in an open container).

Safety - Freedom from danger of injury.

Safety data sheet - A document that is designed to provide the information necessary to store and handle hazardous chemicals safely. These documents are produced by the manufacturer or importer of each hazardous chemical.

Safe work methods - A set of instructions designed to communicate definite or standardized procedures to staff. These are used to obtain consistency in results and increase safety and efficiency in the workplace. Also known as Safe Operating Procedures, Standard Operating Procedure, Protocols etc.

Procedure

Emergency information

  1. Emergency Chemical Response queries should be initially directed to the local area management, and then the Work Environment Group (x52193). Emergency Services response is coordinated through the local area.
  2. After-hours contact ANU Security (x52249).
  3. This hazard management procedure has been developed by The Australian National University to compliment the safe and reliable management of hazardous materials within the University. In managing hazardous materials the University advocates a risk management approach to minimise the risks to staff, students, contractors and visitors in relation to the storage, handling and disposal of materials associated within the range of research, teaching and operational tasks undertaken within the University.
  4. See: Guideline A for a description of Risk Management.
  5. Hazardous Waste is considered any waste that has the potential to exert a detrimental effect on people or on biological systems in the environment.
  6. The aim of this document is to provide practical guidance on the management of Hazardous Waste generated by laboratories and workshops at ANU. The responsible management of hazardous waste involves several aspects, including:
  1. minimising the generation of the waste
  2. correctly characterising and labelling the waste material
  3. determining the most appropriate treatment and waste disposal method
  4. safely storing and handling the waste, and finally
  5. disposing of the waste in an environmentally and socially acceptable manner.
  1. It is essential that any hazardous waste generated be disposed of in a way that minimises any risk to health and safety, or to the environment. Compliance with other ANU Policies on Occupational Health and Safety and the Environment is also required and these policies should also be consulted. (see: ANU Policies and the Environment).

Part 2: Legislative and regulatory requirements

Legislative and regulatory obligations

  1. This procedure is governed by ANU following Commonwealth and ACT legislation and regulatory obligations:
  • Work Health Safety Act 2011.
  • Work Health Safety Regulations 2011.
  • Chapter 7 - Hazardous Chemicals.
  • Chapter 9 - Major Hazard Facilities.
  • Code of Practice for Labelling of Workplace Hazardous Chemicals 2011.
  • Medicines, Poisons and Therapeutic Goods Act 2008.
  • National Industrial Chemicals Notification & Assessment Scheme (NICNAS).
  • Industrial Chemicals (Notification & Assessment) Act 1989.
  • Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998.
  • Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Regulations 1999.
  • Nuclear Non-Proliferation (Safeguards) Act 1987.
  • ACT Radiation Protection Act 2006.
  • ACT Radiation Protection Regulations 2007.
  • Gene Technology Act 2000.
  • Quarantine Act 1908.

Chemical waste

  1. Within the Australian Capital Territory, Environment Protection Authority considers that only environmentally benign chemicals due either to an intrinsic lack of toxicity, or to the small quantity of material being disposed of, may be released (with approval) into the environment. Disposals of environmentally-benign materials are allowed to the:
  • air
  • sewage system, or
  • landfill.
  1. See: Guideline B Chemical waste management for further information
  2. See: Hazardous Waste management procedure flowchart
  3. Only minimum quantities of material may be discharged to the sewerage system as defined in the ACTEW Trade Waste disposal guidelines and trade waste agreement.
  4. For bulk waste chemicals, Environment Protection Authority -approved contractors must be used to dispose of the waste. The contractors generally transport the waste to interstate for treatment/disposal (see: External Waste Contractors)
  5. Environmentally benign waste may be disposed of by landfill within the Mugga Lane Landfill. Prior approval for the disposal is required from the Environment Protection Authority using the guidelines and application form
  6. Nanoparticles and Nanotechnology related work please refer to Safe Work Australia

Biological waste

  1. The guiding principle with biological waste is that all biological material shall be rendered harmless (i.e. incapable of multiplying or transmitting genetic material) before leaving the control of the person who knows most about it. Generally, this means autoclaving, or killing (e.g. with chemical disinfectant) at the laboratory followed by transport of the material to the licensed disposal facility. Disposal of clinical or infectious waste have to follow guidelines imposed by the National Health and Medical Research Council (National Guidelines for the Management of Clinical and Related Wastes, 1988). The ACT also has its own Clinical Waste Act 1990, and associated Clinical Waste Manual 1991.
  2. See: Guideline C Biological waste management for more information
  3. See: Hazardous Waste management procedure flowchart
  4. See: NHMRC for more information
  5. The Commonwealth's Gene Technology Act 2000 is administered by the Gene Technology Regulator (GTR). The GTR require the Researcher to submit an application to the Institutional Biosafety Committee and the GTR for approval before genetic manipulation work may commence. The GTR requires that all waste from Gene Technology work is sterilised (by autoclaving or superheated steam) or disinfected (liquid microbial waste) prior to disposal (see: GTR for more information).
  6. The Commonwealth's Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service (AQIS) require that materials such as antibodies, antisera, and enzymes be treated as clinical waste. The source material (and their used or unused containers) must be autoclaved and disposed of by incineration or burial.

Radioactive waste

  1. The disposal of radioactive waste in Commonwealth authorities is controlled under the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998 and Regulations as administered by ARPANSA - the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency. Furthermore, ACT requirements must also be complied with.
  2. See: Guideline D Radioactive waste management for more information.
  3. See: Hazardous Waste management procedure flowchart
  4. Regulation 48 requires that dealings with the disposal of radioisotopes are in accordance with:
  5. National Health and Medical Research Council, Code of practice for the disposal of radioactive wastes by the user. NHMRC, Canberra, 1985
  6. National Health and Medical Research Council, Code of practice for the near-surface disposal of radioactive waste in Australia. NHMRC,Canberra,1992)
  7. where disposal involves the release to the environment (sewage, burial etc) an ACT Radiation Council Disposal License is required and must be current for the Budget Unit (enquire with your local RSO).
  8. Radioactive waste can only be disposed of under the terms of these disposal requirements and of any restrictions imposed. Methods of disposal in compliance with the above Codes must be strictly adhered to, and new radioactive experiments requiring different disposal methods or larger quantities of radioactive material must not be attempted without prior approval from ARPANSA via the ANU Radiation Safety Committee and your local RSO. (see: ANU radiation procedure).
  9. The disposal of radioactive waste in the A.C.T. is controlled under the A.C.T. Radiation Protection Act 2006 and A.C.T Radiation Protection Regulations 2007 and requires a Disposal Permit. A Disposal Permit is issued by the ACT Radiation Council and is specific as to:
  1. the nuclides
  2. their quantity and form
  3. the method of disposal (e.g. landfill, sewer, dispersal to air or incineration).
  1. No disposal of radioactive materials is permitted without the knowledge and approval of the holder of the particular Disposal Permit. Check with your Budget Unit Radiation Safety Officer or Hazardous Waste Safety Officer.

Responsibilities

  1. If a Budget Unit of The Australian National University generates hazardous waste, then it is the responsibility of the management (i.e. Director, Research Group leader or nominee) of that Budget Unit to ensure disposal of waste complies with these requirements, the laws and guidelines of the Commonwealth and ACT governments, and with the recommended practices of the scientific community. It is generally good practice for a Budget Unit to require the individual waste generator to be responsible for the hazardous wastes they generate.
  2. The Director is responsible for:
  • ensuring a risk assessment process/system is implemented for the storage and handling of all hazardous waste
  • providing, and maintaining appropriate facilities and resources to ensure a safe and healthy work environment
  • providing the necessary resources to access information on hazardous materials (see: Chemgold 3 for Safety Data Sheets)
  • Providing the necessary resources to maintain regulatory registers and records. (see: University chemical inventory system)
  • providing the necessary resources to manage and dispose of hazardous waste in an approved manner
  • ensuring a HR departure process is implemented including transferring material responsibility and ownership
  1. The Research Group Leader/Manager is responsible for:
  • undertaking a risk assessment for the storage and handling of all hazardous materials
  • managing, documenting and addressing the risks associated with hazardous substances. When the risks are considered unacceptable the work shall not be undertaken
  • providing clear and consistent supervision, instruction and training (see: Hazardous waste safety courses)
  • Maintaining regulatory registers and records (see: University chemical inventory system)
  • ensuring that (at least) annual inspections are conducted to check the integrity of the processes
  • ensuring responsibility is transferred upon departing the University
  • managing and disposing of hazardous wastes in an approved manner
  • reporting incidents in the agreed manner (see: Reporting incidents).
  1. Users are responsible for:
  1. Furthermore, the waste generator is responsible for managing:
  • waste minimisation
  • identification of the waste
  • treatment or pre-treatment (if required)
  • packaging the waste
  • labelling the waste with all the appropriate labels / information
  • storage within the laboratory or workshop
  • transport (within the building) and
  • (Assisting in) Arranging disposal using procedures approved by the Budget Unit.
  1. This procedure summarise the information and facilities currently available to Budget Unit management for the disposal of chemical, biological and radioactive wastes.
  2. The management process is assisted by a network of "Hazardous Waste Safety Officers" that are knowledgeable in ANU procedures, Budget Unit process and liaise with External Waste Contractors. If in doubt about the appropriate procedure for a particular waste, please consult a Hazardous Waste Safety Officer. The Work Environment Group presents a special training course for Hazardous Waste Safety Officers.
  3. See: Hazardous Waste Safety Officers
  4. See: External Waste Contractors
  5. See: Training course for Hazardous Waste Safety Officers
  6. See: Work Environment Group

Part 3: Managing waste disposal at ANU

Assessing the risk

  1. A Standard Operating Procedure must consider the generation of waste and ensure that a waste disposal route is available / known. Where hazardous waste is being generated a risk assessment must be conducted.
  2. See: Guideline A for details on conducting a risk assessment
  3. The following points should also be considered when dealing with hazardous waste

Waste minimisation

  1. Every effort should be made to reduce the generation of hazardous waste. Thus the primary focus for the management of hazardous waste is on the process that generates the waste. Consider:
  • why is such a process being used
  • can it be substituted by another process
  • can the process be modified to produce less waste
  • can the process be modified to produce a less intractable waste
  • can the waste be easily modified or treated to produce a waste that is more stable or easier to dispose of
  • can the waste be used for other purposes or be recycled?
  1. Hazards associated with a waste and the risks associated with waste disposal need to be considered and indicated in the handling protocol, experiment document or workbook. This needs some knowledge of the initial entities and hazards, any intermediates and products generated. The storage and handling of the waste material needs to be considered before any actual waste is generated.
  2. Material presenting multiple hazards
  3. Some materials for disposal may present multiple hazards. The main categories of hazards to be considered are:
  • chemical reactivity (including toxicants and cytotoxics)
  • biological infectivity
  • radioactivity
  • a material containing multiple hazards. For example consider an animal tissue containing a pathogen that was cultured in the presence of a, radioactively labelled organic chemical.
  1. It is important that as much information as possible about the composition of a waste material be obtained before attempts are made for its disposal. When this information is available then a judgement can be made as to which hazard should be dealt with first while, at the same time, strict precautions are maintained regarding the other hazards present in the material. For the example given above, the following order of treatment should be appropriate:
  • the chemical reactivity should be neutralised (see Guideline B - Chemical Waste Disposal). This may include pH adjustment to neutralize and deactivate the active moieties by chemical reaction, adsorption on activated carbon, etc
  • the biological activity can be destroyed by the use of Hibitane and/or chlorizing (see Guideline C- Biological Waste Disposal). This treatment should be checked for compatibility with any inherent chemical activity of the material. The treatment will assist in the deactivation of some forms of chemical activity.
  • if the radionuclide has a short half-life (e.g. 32P), the material should be stored until the activity has reached background level, if the radionuclide has a long half-life (e.g.14C), appropriate disposal should be undertaken following the information given in Guideline D - Radioactive Waste Disposal.
  1. Experienced staff and/or the Hazardous Waste Safety Officer should be consulted to ensure the appropriate treatment and disposal of materials.
  2. See: Hazardous Waste Safety Officers

Containers used for hazardous waste

  1. The containers or packaging that a waste material is placed in can significantly affect the storage and handling of the material. The container/packaging of a waste material should be:
  • sturdy
  • made of compatible materials, to prevent deterioration of the packaging
  • protect the contents from environment hazards, for example excessive light, heat or cold, and shock
  • limit the impact of the material on the environment or risk of adverse reactions
  • appropriately sealed or closed
  • appropriately labelled, and
  • (In general) not more than 20 kg or 20 L (laboratory waste containers should be a smaller volume). Ideally laboratory waste should not exceed five L or kg.
  1. See: Guideline B Chemical waste disposal for more information
  2. See: Guideline C Biological waste disposal for more information
  3. See: Guideline D Radioactive waste disposal for more information
  4. Details of various containers are available. The storage vessel used in a laboratory or workshop environment may be different to that required for the transport of waste off campus by a waste contractor. Where a waste is being directly packaged for transport, contact the waste contractor or the Hazardous Waste Safety Officer for specific packaging requirements. Some waste contractors will supply storage/transport drums free of charge. Containers that can be used for storage and transport should be used in preference to others to reduce risk associated with transferring.
  5. See: Hazardous waste safety officers
  6. See: External waste contractors
  7. See: Suitable waste containers
  8. Material - A storage container may be a bottle, jar, drum or bag. They can be made of glass, reinforced glass (coated with a plastic film/sleeve), plastic or metal. Details of various containers are available.
  9. The Safety Data Sheet provides information (for chemicals) on the most compatible container material. For storing waste materials, chose the material that is suitable for the component of greatest volume.
  10. Clear glass for chemical waste containers.
  11. Red bags for Radiation waste (for burial).
  12. Yellow bags for biological waste.
  13. See: Suitable waste containers

Labelling of hazardous waste

  1. The hazardous waste must be appropriately labelled. The type of label depends on the hazard associated with the waste, and may include:
  • a chemical waste label
  • a chemical storage stability risk label
  • a radioactive material label
  • a biological material (biohazard) label/sign
  • or a combination of the above.
  1. See: Guideline B Chemical waste disposal for more information
  2. See: Guideline C Biological waste disposal for more information
  3. See: Guideline D Radioactive waste disposal for more information
  4. In addition, the general information required on a label includes:
  • the area/group the material originated from
  • name of material and classification (eg. Hazardous Substance, Biological Waste, Radioactive Material)
  • a date (of generation)
  • specific details covered in the chemical, biological, and radioactive waste sections
  • waste containers must be easily distinguishable from other chemical containers
  • consider waste containers that are specific for the experiment, chemical residue or waste stream.
  1. The labelling used in a laboratory or workshop environment may be different to that required for the transport of waste off campus by a waste contractor. The waste contractor may be contacted (via the Hazardous Waste Safety Officer) for their specific labelling requirements.
  2. A summary list of current available labels is available (Appendix A).
  3. See: Hazardous Waste Safety Officers
  4. See: External Waste Contractors

Segregation of hazardous waste

  1. Segregation of wastes is a very important aspect of waste disposal. Wastes are segregated to:
  • Reduce the risk of an adverse chemical reaction occurring, particularly between different groups or classes of materials, and to
  • Assist in the appropriate disposal route.
  1. See: Guideline C Biological waste disposal for more information
  2. See: Guideline D Radioactive waste disposal for more information
  3. Chemical wastes and chemically contaminated materials should be divided into compatible groups.
  4. See: Guideline B Chemical waste disposal for more information
  5. Choose the group that is the most specific to that chemical or consider a pre-treatment (neutralisation or deactivation). Contact your Hazardous Waste Safety Officer for advice. The Dangerous Good Classes are one simple way of segregating wastes into acceptable groups. They are the minimum segregation required under the Australian Dangerous Goods Code for the transport of dangerous goods by road and rail. However, the variety and complexity of chemicals and their mixtures present at ANU usually requires additional segregation or at least consideration of the chemicals' properties, hazards and risks.

Dangerous goods of different classes should not be stored together.

  1. See: Hazardous Waste safety officers
  2. See: Dangerous good classes
  3. A chart indicating dangerous goods segregation is available. If in doubt, do not mix chemical wastes from different experiments or processes. A more complex chemical compatibility chart may be used as for additional segregation of chemicals and wastes. However, like most things, these charts have limitations and exceptions. Please use this chart as a first indicator and combine with information presented in the Safety Data Sheets and other references.
  4. See: Complex chemical compatibility chart
  5. See: Chart indicating dangerous goods segregation
  6. See: Safety Data Sheets

Storage of hazardous waste

  1. Hazardous Waste must be safely stored to prevent adverse reactions as indicated in the following documents on -
  2. See: Guideline B Chemical waste disposal for more information
  3. See: Guideline C Biological waste disposal for more information
  4. See: Guideline D Radioactive waste disposal for more information
  5. In general, hazardous wastes are stored under the same conditions as similar non-waste materials. For example, flammable liquid waste is stored similar to other flammable liquids
  6. Dangerous goods of different classes should not be stored together.

Packages should be protected from harsh environmental conditions.

  1. General waste materials should be stored at ambient conditions. That is:
  • room temperature (or temperature in the range 14 - 26 °C)
  • typical humidity levels (30 - 60 % RH)
  • room light levels (or in the dark)
  • as well as being protected from impact, disposed of within six months
  • If the conditions for safe storage vary from the above, the conditions should be highlighted on the waste disposal risk assessment form
  • Store waste containers so that the labels are visible
  • Additional waste storage area requirements, covering security, access, registers, signage and safety are available in Hazardous Waste Storage Facilities section below.
  1. See: Chemical Waste disposal risk assessment form
  2. Hazardous waste storage facilities are those areas used to store hazardous waste while awaiting pickup by a waste contractor. A waste storage facility:
  • is a Hazardous and Restricted location under University's Policy and Procedure
  • should be secure, with access limited to authorised persons only - eg. the Hazardous Waste Safety Officer, Radiation Safety Officer, biological safety officer, chemical safety officer, senior technical officers, and their deputies.
  1. See: Hazardous and Restricted location
  • is strictly controlled in terms of the material accepted (appropriate package type, labelled, and risk assessed), their storage assignment/location and manifest (see below) of facility contents.
  • For chemical waste - A completed documented waste stability label (risk assessment) should be sighted/collected/confirmed before the waste is accepted.
  1. See: Hazardous Waste Safety Officers
  2. See: Waste disposal risk assessment form
  3. See: Suitable waste containers
  • a manifest form is available for chemical waste, biological waste and radioactive waste
  • a hazardous waste store should only contain hazardous waste
  • items likely to be stored for more than 3 months should be inspected (generally monthly) for:
  • leakage
  • gas pressure build-up within the contained
  • unusual changes in material, substance, or condition.
  • the responsible safety officer may relax this requirement for radioactive or biological waste
  • allow for the separation and segregation of waste according to their hazards or Dangerous Goods Class
  • meet the design requirements for dangerous goods stores. This should include some bunding or containment to prevent spills/leaks from entering the environment
  • packages should be protected from harsh environmental conditions
  • have access to a spill control kit and spill management plan
  • adequately ventilated to reduce the accumulation of explosive or harmful vapours
  • items should not be stored directly on the floor. Adequate shelves, storage bins/containment trays should be provided
  • maintained in a neat and tidy condition at all times
  • store waste containers so that the label is visible.

Transport of hazardous waste

  1. Transportation of hazardous waste may occur between:
  • laboratory to laboratory
  • laboratory to hazardous waste store.
  1. It is important to ensure that the material is:
  • labelled with the appropriate type of waste and identified as indicated in the sections below, and
  • appropriately contained (at least a primary and secondary level of containment).
  1. The transport of hazardous material around the ANU Campus should only occur with the consent of the Hazardous Waste Safety Officers. Transport of material on public roads around ANU should consider the requirements of the Australian Dangerous Goods Code for road and rail. The transport of hazardous waste by air is covered by the Civil Aviation Act 1988. Materials to be transported (off campus) must be conducted by an A.C.T. licensed Waste Disposal Contractor.
  2. See: Hazardous Waste Safety Officers
  3. See: External Waste Contractors
  4. The process of waste disposal generally requires transportation of the waste from the location where the waste was generated to the location of its disposal. For this transportation to be done in the safest possible way it is essential that the following needs be considered:
  • packaging of the waste in a form suitable for the type of transportation
  • labelling of the packaged waste
  • storage prior to transport
  • labelling of the transport vehicle
  • transportation to the site of disposal
  1. Suitable containers must be Dangerous Goods approved as indicated by a series of symbols and codes stamped into the container. Chemical disposal in the majority of cases involves Waste Disposal Contractors who will have the specifications and materials required for packaging, labelling and transport to the site of disposal. It is the responsibility of the Budget Unit and Waste generator to ensure that the waste is correctly stored while awaiting disposal. Dangerous goods of different classes should not be stored together. Packages should be protected from harsh environmental conditions and unauthorised access. In general, chemical waste shall be stored under similar conditions as the original material. (see: External Waste Contractors).
  2. Detailed storage, packaging and transport requirements can be found in the following codes:
  • Australian Code for the Transport of Dangerous Goods by Road and Rail
  • Dangerous Goods Regulations, International Air Transport Association
  • Code of Practice for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Substances
  • A.C.T. Radiation Protection Act.
  1. Copies of these documents are available at the Work Environment Group for consultation.

Disposal of hazardous waste

  1. The Operations, Business, Faculty Manager (Budget Unit management) must have a waste disposal process in place. It is likely that smaller waste generators can seek assistance from the larger Schools and Departments to assist in the safe storage and disposal of small quantities of waste.
  2. See: External Waste Contractors
  3. However, a Budget Unit is responsible for the safe storage and disposal of any waste it generates. The local Hazardous Waste Safety Officer should be able to assist in the waste disposal process and the collection by authorised waste contractors.
  4. See: Hazardous Waste Safety Officers
  5. See: External Waste Contractors
  6. Any hazardous waste that cannot be safely disposed of (or cannot be disposed of within the requirements of the current guidelines) should be rendered as safe as possible, labelled, securely stored, and reported to the Hazardous Waste Safety Officer and OHS Officer for the attention of the Hazardous Waste Safety Committee.
  7. See: Hazardous Waste Safety Officers
  8. See: OHS Officer
  9. See: Hazardous Waste Safety Committee
  10. It is essential that any hazardous waste generated be disposed of in a way that minimises any risk to health and safety, or to the environment. It may be possible to dispose of waste by the following routes:
  • deactivation / Neutralisation or other (waste) modification process
  • air
  • landfill / Burial
  • sewerage system
  • waste disposal contractor
  1. See: External Waste Contractors
  2. There are limits and licensing arrangements for release to the environment. The conditions and expectations are outlined in the following sections. If in doubt, please contact a Hazardous Waste Safety Officer. Where the disposal route involves the sewerage system, disposal must meet the criteria of the ACTEW Trade Waste Guidelines and a building's Trade Waste limits. Any new Trade Waste application should be made through consultation with the Hazardous Waste Safety Officer and Facilities and Services, Hydrology Unit.

Waste monitoring

  1. The hazardous waste management process is expected to be monitored on a regular or ad-hoc basis by the Budget Unit and/or the hazardous waste officer.
  2. Harmful chemicals should be disposed of via a waste contractor and according to the trade waste disposal guidelines and waste disposal permit (see: External Waste Contractors).

Part 4: Incident reporting and emergency procedures

Incident reporting

  1. The reporting of incidents, accidents, significant exposures and dangerous occurrences assists the University community avoiding repeated incidents. All incidents involving the storage and handling of chemicals at the university must be reported via the University's on-line Incident Notification Form.
  2. See: University's on-line Incident Notification Form.

Emergency procedures

  1. Consideration must be given to what emergencies may eventuate from the storage and handling of waste before any waste is generated. Local and University emergency procedures should be considered. Preparation for emergencies should be considered in the establishment of handling protocols.
  2. See: University emergency procedures
  3. All personnel in laboratories should be familiar with the First Aid Procedures for exposure to chemicals. First Aid Procedures should take, into account the following:
  • unusual or unique first aid or medical treatments should be identified, and any specific treatment items obtained before handling the waste for which the specific treatments are required
  • first aid officers in the relevant areas should be informed of the requirements for, and locations of, unusual or unique treatments
  • in such situations the Work Environment Group shall also be informed so that, if necessary, they may be included in communication with relevant groups.
  1. See: First Aid Procedures and Work Environment Group.
  2. Appropriate types and amounts of spill containment and absorbing materials shall be made available before commencing any procedure with hazardous waste. The response to a waste spill should consider the ANU Laboratory Spill Management Document, any local area procedures and specific risks identified.
  3. See: Spill containment and absorbing materials, ANU Laboratory Spill Management Document
  4. The risk of fires and adverse chemical reactions should be identified and appropriate risk reduction measures employed. These include:
  • minimising the quantities, volumes or scale of the reaction
  • appropriate experimental equipment design
  • using specialised equipment such as fume cupboards and blast shields, and
  • having appropriate fire-fighting spill cleaning equipment available.
  1. 63. Responses to fires and adverse chemical reactions should be in accordance with any local area procedures and ANU procedures (see: Fume cupboards hazard management procedure and ANU emergency procedures).

Training obligations/courses

  1. Work Environment Group runs chemical, biological, radiation and hazardous waste safety officer courses. Some local OHS Committees have made these courses compulsorily for new users.
  2. Local induction must cover aspects of waste disposal safety and management requirements.
  3. See: Training course for Hazardous Waste Safety Officers, local induction chemical safety and management requirements and Work Environment Group.

Labels

  1. Storage of waste risk assessment reminder label for attaching to fume cupboards and other storage areas
  2. Waste bottle storage labels, for storing:

Associated documents

Information

Printable version (PDF)
Title Hazardous waste management
Document Type Procedure
Document Number ANUP_000592
Version 4
Purpose To outline the procedure for managing hazardous waste at the Australian National University.
Audience Staff
Category Administrative
Topic/ SubTopic Health, Safety & Environment - Occupational Health & Safety
 
Effective Date 21 Mar 2012
Review Date 30 Jun 2015
 
Responsible Officer Director, Human Resources
Approved By: Chief Operating Officer
Contact Area Human Resources Division
Authority

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